Missouri Whitetails - Your Missouri Hunting Resource banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got my GAS BILL on my OLD house. and it scared me.

My house built in 1920 has a ton of holes...and leaks. I have sealed up windows, door jams and all that. I have covered all the holes that are in the crawl space walls to stop the radiant heat loss.

We got this house cheap and knew it would need some love. I want to add wood stove but have concerns about chimney height, installation and all that.

Are there any options to go out a wall and vent? or do i have to go to the roof...at least 2 ft above anything within 10' horozontaily (sp).

I do think that It will pay for itself this winter....I have all the free wood I need. until next year when windows are replaced and I do more stuff....

Help and tips and or advice would be greatly apprecieated.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,462 Posts
Improving insulation including storm windows and insulated doors should help especially with an outside wood furnace.
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
46,704 Posts
Is there an existing chimney in the house? Being built in 1920, I'm sure there was at one time if it's not still there.

If it is there, has it been used to exhaust propane heat? If so, do not use it for wood heat. The combination of propane gases & wood smoke cause the mortar to rot & your just asking for trouble.

If there's not an existing flu, there's not any real cheap/safe options. Triple wall pipe is probably the easiest option, but it's not cheap. Don't be surprised if it costs $700-1000 just for the flu.

Outdoor wood stoves are the best option IMO. The one I'm currently using is not the one i want permanantly, but it's getting the job done without breaking the bank. Its vents through the window & I run an insulated flex duct to another window fro the cold air return to circulate the heat throughout the house. Works pretty decent. We paid around $1500 for this stove. This our 3rd winter heating with it.

What I really intend to go to permanently is an outdoor wood boiler. The stove is place a ways from the house & electric & water lines are trenched from the house to the stove. A pump circulates the water through a manifold that is installed in your exhisting air handler. Kinda like the A coil in your central air unit. They're very pricey though. Starting at around $4000 & going up. A lot of these units can be used to heat multiple buildings though, like your shop & your house.

Hope this overview helped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
You can vent through a wall as long as you maintain the correct clearances from combustibles. Either way I would use a solid pack insulated stainless steel chimney. Any way you go it still needs to 2 ft higher than anything within 10 feet of it horizontally. I have included a not so good drawing below. If you can manage it I would recommend an outside wood furnace and be sure to check with your insurance company before you do anything.

[file]44762[/file]
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
46,704 Posts
Originally posted by Grumpy
You can vent through a wall as long as you maintain the correct clearances from combustibles. Either way I would use a solid pack insulated stainless steel chimney. Any way you go it still needs to 2 ft higher than anything within 10 feet of it horizontally. I have included a not so good drawing below. If you can manage it I would recommend an outside wood furnace and be sure to check with your insurance company before you do anything.
Good info there grumpy. The stover we're currently using, uses a piece of 10' metal duct work for a flu. It's just a barrel stove with an insulated jacket around it with a fan to force the heat into the house. The stove sits 5' from the house & believe it or not, this thing draws surprisingly well, even though the flu is not above the roof line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Here's a pic of the solid pack flue. It is better than the air insulated double or triple wall stuff. You probably need a 6 inch chimney. Just match the collar coming from your stove. It could be 8 inch but more than likely 6 inch. It comes in different lengths and is made by several different companys.

 

·
Lunch break commander
Joined
·
8,344 Posts
Originally posted by Grumpy
Here's a pic of the solid pack flue. It is better than the air insulated double or triple wall stuff. You probably need a 6 inch chimney. Just match the collar coming from your stove. It could be 8 inch but more than likely 6 inch. It comes in different lengths and is made by several different companys.

I have put in a lot of this stuff and I think it is about the best. it is a little high but by far safer than most other options. Most of what I put in was for fireplace type inserts and went into new houses where they built a huge chase to conceal it and provide the conbustible clearances.

They do make stand off brackets that are designed to provide your clearances and also allow you to to anchor it to wood.

I have never installed it where ran up the side of a house but I am sure it can be done.

dont some people use well casing to run a flue that way. A pipe fiter would no more about welding the tee in it and other details.

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts

"I have never installed it where ran up the side of a house but I am sure it can be done.

dont some people use well casing to run a flue that way. A pipe fiter would no more about welding the tee in it and other details. good luck"


Pastor,
The trouble with just running a steel pipe up the side of a building is, any chimney whether it be masonry, Stainless Steel or anything else needs to hot to work properly. A steel pipe up the side of a house will never stay hot enough to draw good and the main thing is a cold chimney will always have creosote forming inside it, it can be liquid or solid building up inside your chimney. (That's what causes chimney fires). Not to mention a bare steel pipe would need to be a long ways from anything combustible to be safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
Originally posted by pinwheel
Is there an existing chimney in the house? Being built in 1920, I'm sure there was at one time if it's not still there.

If it is there, has it been used to exhaust propane heat? If so, do not use it for wood heat. The combination of propane gases & wood smoke cause the mortar to rot & your just asking for trouble.

If there's not an existing flu, there's not any real cheap/safe options. Triple wall pipe is probably the easiest option, but it's not cheap. Don't be surprised if it costs $700-1000 just for the flu.

Outdoor wood stoves are the best option IMO. The one I'm currently using is not the one i want permanantly, but it's getting the job done without breaking the bank. Its vents through the window & I run an insulated flex duct to another window fro the cold air return to circulate the heat throughout the house. Works pretty decent. We paid around $1500 for this stove. This our 3rd winter heating with it.

What I really intend to go to permanently is an outdoor wood boiler. The stove is place a ways from the house & electric & water lines are trenched from the house to the stove. A pump circulates the water through a manifold that is installed in your exhisting air handler. Kinda like the A coil in your central air unit. They're very pricey though. Starting at around $4000 & going up. A lot of these units can be used to heat multiple buildings though, like your shop & your house.

Hope this overview helped.
Ya my buddy uses the outside wood furnace and loves it. You talking about eating the wood though. He has a line ran to his shop but hasnt got it hooked up yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This house does have an old brick chimney in it...Its cased in a wall, I noticed it one day walking around up stairs and looked behind a wall and saw it. It was shopped off and the hole in the roof covered or filled in.

I thought about using it and just running normal pipe inside it and then only have to use 3-4 ft of class a for going through the roof.

Only problem is I dont like where this spot is. and I hate the idea of having to cut holes in the ceiling, second story floor then the roof.
 

·
Lunch break commander
Joined
·
8,344 Posts
Originally posted by Grumpy

"I have never installed it where ran up the side of a house but I am sure it can be done.

dont some people use well casing to run a flue that way. A pipe fiter would no more about welding the tee in it and other details. good luck"


Pastor,
The trouble with just running a steel pipe up the side of a building is, any chimney whether it be masonry, Stainless Steel or anything else needs to hot to work properly. A steel pipe up the side of a house will never stay hot enough to draw good and the main thing is a cold chimney will always have creosote forming inside it, it can be liquid or solid building up inside your chimney. (That's what causes chimney fires). Not to mention a bare steel pipe would need to be a long ways from anything combustible to be safe.


That makes good since to me. '

I have vented a lot of gas log inserts out the side of a house but those terminate just outside the exterior wall through a specail vent that does not have to vent above the roof line.

couldnt he line his old flue with a flex liner made for wood burnig and then adapt to the insulated stainless stuff just under the roof flashing.
only if nothing else is vented in it like mentioned above.

He would not have to cut out any ceiling but he would have to put his wood burner next to the flue and that may not be where he wants it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,898 Posts
You would have to run the triple wall down the chimney...I don't think they make flex liners for wood stoves. The heat would burn up most flex liners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,091 Posts
I had one out the side of the wall in AK. They might work better in MO. However even with Metalbestos pipe it was too cold and puked liquid creasote all winter.
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
46,704 Posts
Originally posted by Pastor
dont some people use well casing to run a flue that way. A pipe fiter would no more about welding the tee in it and other details.

good luck
I've seen plenty of shops around here & a few houses done that way. 1/4 or 3/8 wall steel, even if ya get a flew fire, it's not a big deal. Not gonna burn out that heavy wall pipe. To keep the creosote buildup down, all ya gotta do is hit it with the shovel every few days to knock it down to the cleanout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Originally posted by Thayer
You would have to run the triple wall down the chimney...I don't think they make flex liners for wood stoves. The heat would burn up most flex liners.
They do make flexible liners for chimneys in lots of different shapes and sizes. I've installed lots of them. Never like mentioned above. I always went all the way out the roof with them.

Lots of the old flues had 9x9 clay tile in them and were not large enough to get a 6 inch liner down them if the tiles were offset just a little bit. These kind I would bust the old tiles out to get a liner down them. Even if he did reline it, the liner would need to be wrapped with insulation or use a pore in type insulation. He don't have a cheap way to go. Especially with a 2 story house, Best bet if he could do it is outside wood furnace or boiler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Originally posted by pinwheel
Originally posted by Pastor
dont some people use well casing to run a flue that way. A pipe fiter would no more about welding the tee in it and other details.

good luck
I've seen plenty of shops around here & a few houses done that way. 1/4 or 3/8 wall steel, even if ya get a flew fire, it's not a big deal. Not gonna burn out that heavy wall pipe. To keep the creosote buildup down, all ya gotta do is hit it with the shovel every few days to knock it down to the cleanout.
I copied this from another website. They said it better than I could have
There are basically three stages of creosote buildup. The first is a flaky, crystal-like accumulation. This can be removed fairly easily with a chimney brush. The second is a tar-like coating of creosote. This is harder to remove, but can be accomplished with a stiff chimney brush and scraper. The third (and most deadly) is a glossy, enamel-like coating on the flue, this is virtually impossible to remove. Normally the best one can hope to do is scrape off the top layers, and reduce the buildup.

There are some new chemical cleaners which will remove this type of creosote, if professionally applied. Ask your chimney sweep about this procedure. Don't be lulled into a false sense of security with over the counter "chimney cleaners", I have yet to find them to work in the real world as claimed.
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
46,704 Posts
Can't dispute that grumpy. Outdoor flu, especially with thick wall, is not near as dangerous as an indoor flu about a flu fire. As for helping keep creosote buildup down, we always made sure to open the stove up at least once a day & get it burning hot & at least once a week & throw a handful of rocksalt onto a very hot coal bed. Helped to keep the buildup down. As someone already said, creosote builds where the smoke begins cooling. If the entire chimney is hot, it won't cool till it hits the top. Another way to help keep down on creosote is to not burn too much green wood.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top