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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, if ya seen my new BBQ grill / smoker in the other post i am putting on a wood work surface table top etc on the front of it, the wood is a cool wood from south america, it will need something to protect it from the elements.......what would be the best thing to apply.....has to be clear to see the natural wood.........:wave:
 

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PURE KILLER
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ain't gonna matter if its in the elements,just keep it soaked in olive oil:)
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
there will be plenty of olive oil spilt on it i'm sure, still want to put something on it though, that exotic wood wasn't cheep.
 

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White Board Man
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mineral oil and bees wax and let it set in awhile before the next coat
 

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King of Callaway
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I'm thinking PW is your man :cheers:
 

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White Board Man
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This is from one place








Oil Protection


There are numerous oils available . You can save some money by purchasing Food Grade Mineral Oil as this is what is really in the bottles. (not mineral spirits - this is paint thinner)

You do not want to use olive oil, vegetable oil, or other organic or food-based oils. These finishes can become rancid and sticky with regular application and time. It won't hurt the block but it will cause an odor and can impart a taste to food prepared on the surface.

The mineral oil can be applied to the surface with a rag or sponge. It's very simple to apply and difficult to make a mistake. Simply wipe it on the surface and watch it soak in. When the wood won't take any more oil, you can wipe off the excess with a clean dry cloth. Don't worry about applying too much oil - more is better.

New or old butcher blocks that have become dry may need 5-10 coats. Once a block has become conditioned, regular applications of 1-2 coats on a monthly basis are recommended. A beeswax finish should then be applied for optimal performance.




Beeswax Top Coat

The beeswax topcoat is an optional addition to the re-finishing process but is well worth the time. The beeswax sits on the surface of the wood in contrast to the oil that soaks into the wood. As a result the beeswax fills in pores and gaps that thin oil can't bridge. This helps to keep moisture, bacteria, and other contaminants from getting into the wood surface.



The beeswax is an excellent natural moisture barrier. You can test this by splashing water onto the block and watching it bead up. If water sits on the surface for a long time it can cause the wax to turn white in color. The finish will typically go back to normal when it dries out. You can also wipe on more finish at any time. Remember, with a butcher block it is important to keep the oil in the wood and the water out.


To apply the finish, simply wipe it on with a clean cloth. The beeswax is a soft paste that has a similar consistency to that of a shoe polish. Excess finish can be easily buffed off with the cloth. Once the finish has had some time to dry it can be buffed to a shine. The beeswax polish also helps to add a low-luster sheen to the wood's surface. Typically, only one or two coats are needed. The finish is safe for food contact and is actually edible! It can also be used on cutting boards and for kids toys and cribs.


Regular Maintenance

Regular (monthly) applications of mineral oil followed by beeswax finish as described above should be used. Once the wood has been properly conditioned, the re-applications of these finishes will take far less time, effort and materials. The mineral oil can be applied over the beeswax finish.
 

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PURE KILLER
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what you to good to use american wood:mad2:
 

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King of Callaway
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Originally posted by coyotehunter
what you to good to use american wood:mad2:
I think dirty face would like something exotic :rof2:
 

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PURE KILLER
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well he doesn't have many more days and he is a free bird and i sure hope winter kills him,i don't think we can take another year of him
 

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Preferred pronoun-Stud Muffin
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10,590 Posts
There's a product called "salad bowl finish". But for outside, why not spar polyurethane? (Has UV blockers, and is tough as anything you can put on it).

(**disclaimer** I can never repair a finish of anything I do, cause I forget what I put on it years back. Write on the bottom what the finish is to repair in the future).
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
yup dirty face likes exotic things, and we wont go any further then that, 288 will chime in with something real dirty to say......:dancin:.......we still got some time to stick him Yote, keep your knife sharp......:wave:
 

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PURE KILLER
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give it up man,give it up:stirpot:
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Originally posted by Mr_Hannibal
PIN i'm waiting....where are ya???
If you're going to use it as a cutting board, mineral oil is all I've heard of ever using that won't go rancid. Never heard of the bees wax, but it does make sense. Exposed to the elements, nothing is going to hold up overly well.

Sorry hannibal, I don't have a lot of experience with cutting boards.
 
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