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My father in law purchased 90 acres in Morgan County. It's a nice piece, all timber with a couple kill plots and a 1 1/4 acre plot on a ridge top. We've previously been hunting a lease in Scotland county. I had a small plot on it but was limited with what I could do due to having beans and hay on most of the property.

Due to some health issues, he's putting me in charge of handing things and getting it set up the way he wants it.

Father in law wants to add an area at the road for our campers with electricity, so that's my first priority. After this, I get to have some free reign.

It was logged about 25 years ago, and seems pretty open in most places with little light hitting due to the canopy. Lots of mature trees that are at least 12" in diameter. I'd like to open some of this up, and get new growth for browse and bedding, but whats the best way to go about this? I don't want to just start hacking trees. Do I contact a PLC? Are there other resources I should utilize? I don't think my father in law is interested in logging.
 

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I fully agree with Henry. When My brother and I bought our land we were so excited but then it dawned on us... how in the heck do we even start and what's our long term plan? Our real estate agent (Steve Mott) recommended getting in touch with a local PLC and it was a spot on. It's given us an understanding what we've got an how best to manage it for the goals we've set with the PLC. Having a PLC written plan can also be used to qualify for State or Federal funds to help with the work. Speak with your county agent on how to get that ball rolling. It's not a lot but it helps cover the cost of fuel, upkeep and repairs on equipment.
 

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Being able to identify trees, shrubs and forbs/grasses is important. Read up on what is most and least beneficial to deer, turkey and other wildlife so you keep the good and get rid of the bad from a wildlife perspective. The PLC will help you with some of this, but isn't going to be there every day, so the sooner you can separate the good from the bad, the better.
Ideally for 80 acres on up, I'd like having about 50 % or more wooded, 20-25% in WSG and old field, 10-15% row crops, 10-15% clover fields/food plots and the balance in creeks/ponds. I also think its important to see what you have around you. Look at each neighboring farm for at least a mile in every direction and try to provide more of the habitat or food they don't have enough of.
Good luck and enjoy.
 
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