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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering how early I should start tearing the ground up and getting it limed. We are going to be doing a couple more areas that haven't been limed before and I want it ready to go for my fall hunting plots.

Do I need to ripped the ground up first before I lime or can I just throw the lime on it first and then let it soak in and disk later?
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Anytime you've got lime is a good time to lime. Winter is optimum if you're having it spread by truck. Make sure the ground is froze solid before you put a heavy truck in there. Come spring, when the ground is ready to work, you'll incorporate the lime into the ground then.
 

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From what I've seen, many farmers lime their fields in the winter while the ground if frozen and then work it the ground during spring.

If it is going to be a fall hunting plot, I would wait until spring to lime and disc shortly after.

You definitely want it down by May at the latest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input. We'll just use the gator or back of the truck bed and spread the lime ourselves. The plots we are doing aren't very big anyways so it shouldn't be too hard to spread the lime ourselves.

I'm not going to bother with a soil sample so what's the recommended rate to lime otherwise? Isn't like 2 tons per acre or something like that?
 

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Originally posted by seth_turner_04
Thanks for the input. We'll just use the gator or back of the truck bed and spread the lime ourselves. The plots we are doing aren't very big anyways so it shouldn't be too hard to spread the lime ourselves.

I'm not going to bother with a soil sample so what's the recommended rate to lime otherwise? Isn't like 2 tons per acre or something like that?
if you are not doing much you may want to go with pellitized lime so it will be much easier to spread :cheers:
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Originally posted by seth_turner_04
Thanks for the input. We'll just use the gator or back of the truck bed and spread the lime ourselves. The plots we are doing aren't very big anyways so it shouldn't be too hard to spread the lime ourselves.

I'm not going to bother with a soil sample so what's the recommended rate to lime otherwise? Isn't like 2 tons per acre or something like that?
Yeah, without a soil test, 2 ton per acre should be a big help. I'd still do it while the ground is frozen, it'll be a lot easier on the ground, rather than having to fix ruts later. Unless it's hilly ground, the lime will still be there come spring. If it's pretty hilly & prone to heavy run off, you might want to wait till right before you can work the ground to spread.
 

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just a no body
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last year we bought Garden lime from Orchlins in the 50 lb bags..it was cheaper than the local MFA & it spread real easy out of our seed broadcaster on the back of the ATV.. of course these were very small areas.

I would suggest testing the soil you might find you dont need tons per acres
 

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Originally posted by beanpile
last year we bought Garden lime from Orchlins in the 50 lb bags..it was cheaper than the local MFA & it spread real easy out of our seed broadcaster on the back of the ATV.. of course these were very small areas.

I would suggest testing the soil you might find you dont need tons per acres
It's pretty tough to get MO soil too sweet with lime. At least that's what the guys in the know tell me.
 

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just a no body
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10-4 on that... I was just suggesting that since he's spreading out the back of a vehicle ... arms/back might get pretty sore if he is doing tons instead of 100's of LB's. especially if its not needed. I have heard of too much lime.

doing tons from with garden lime could get rather expensive .
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Originally posted by beanpile
doing tons from with garden lime could get rather expensive .
Yep, it would. Ag lime is by far the cheapest way to go, if you've got tons to spread. Last time I bought pel lime in bulk was this fall for my pond dam & it was $125/ton. Haven't priced ag lime lately, but last time I had some spread it was like $15/ton & that included spreading.
 

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I just did 30 tons, it cost me $600 spread. It was worth it. We put 3 tons per acre on the fields.

For fields with established crops, such as clover and alfalfa, if you lime in the winter, do you just let winter snow and spring rains get the lime into the soil? It wouldn't make any sense to disturb an established field by discing. It may be a dumb question but I'm still learning. Thanks.
 

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Originally posted by Keef
I just did 30 tons, it cost me $600 spread. It was worth it. We put 3 tons per acre on the fields.

For fields with established crops, such as clover and alfalfa, if you lime in the winter, do you just let winter snow and spring rains get the lime into the soil? It wouldn't make any sense to disturb an established field by discing. It may be a dumb question but I'm still learning. Thanks.
Yea just let the moisture break it down and leach into the soil.
 

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Originally posted by Ozarks-Bowhunter
Soil test are cheap considering the money it could save you. I would test for sure.
I agree...
Just let the university extension do it. You'll get a soil report that will lend you more info than just pH adjustment.

We had some ground in your area tested last year Seth and they recommended 0 lime. Not saying your ground is the same, but the fil was going to lime it without knowing whether it was needed or not.
Most likely if your ground is reclaimed forest floor, it'll be acidic.
If lime is needed, you'll get a recommended ENM number to work from outta the soil test report.
 

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I did a soil test of the fields before we limed them. They recommended 5 tons per acre. I thought I'd try the 3 tons and see what that did. 5 tons would have been pretty heavy all at one time. I'll do another test in the spring, if they need more, I'll do the other 2 tons then.
 

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just a no body
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Originally posted by Keef
I did a soil test of the fields before we limed them.

They recommended 5 tons per acre.

I thought I'd try the 3 tons and see what that did. 5 tons would have been pretty heavy all at one time. I'll do another test in the spring, if they need more, I'll do the other 2 tons then.
:eek: wowzers
 

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We put some lime on that field a couple of years ago. I guess it was sufficient to at least get it started. Now we hope to maintain it. This year's crop planted in the fall did very well.
 
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