1. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Found this in flower today. Usually not very big, rare native. It's a legume, and is the only native tree I know that the petiole completely covers the bud.

    [​IMG]
     

  2. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    I'm just gonna have to do this. :pop:
     
  3. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Naw, kgdog, every OTHER pic I put up is pawpaw!:cheers:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    When you tell us I'll prolly know it. But right now I'm eating pop corn myself.:blah:
     
  5. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Hab?
    i know woodchuck would know. Flowers were kinda wilty, sat in the truck for a few hours.
     
  6. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Yellowwood
    Cladrastus lutea (kentukea)
    I cropped the part that showed the yellow inner bark. Sorry.
     
  7. fishshooter

    fishshooter Well-Known Member

    Mar 30, 2007
    Reform
    [rquote=1270906&tid=88977&author=UrbanHunter]Hab?
    i know woodchuck would know[/rquote]

    Ya he would, I can say that since the good for nothing varmint is out on field.

    Glad I didn't knock him in the head as a pup, he kinda turned out handy :cheers:
     
  8. kgdog

    kgdog Senior Member

    umm... catalpa is blooming now too ...has white flowers
     
  9. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    Yella wood huh, isnt't that the stuff they been making them commercials about? So is that you we've been seein' on T.V. riding around on that big horse?:cheers:
     
  10. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    :roll2:

    I can't say I heard or run across that one yet.
     
  11. MoBowman

    MoBowman New Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    Lee's Summit
    [rquote=1271355&tid=88977&author=jaytee]Yella wood huh, isnt't that the stuff they been making them commercials about? So is that you we've been seein' on T.V. riding around on that big horse?:cheers:[/rquote]


    :rof2::hysterical: The guy on the horse is ALOT taller than ole Urbanhunter is. :D
     
  12. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    [rquote=1271556&tid=88977&author=HabitatMD]

    I can't say I heard or run across that one yet.[/rquote]

    Me either
     
  13. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    EVERYONE's taller than me, MoBow... cept'n you, maybe!:blah:

    Steyermark shows the yellow wood in almost every county. I've not come across it in the wild, though. Saw it in the Smokies, but not Mo.
     
  14. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    UrbanHunter, what does the fruit look like, and does it grow in river bottoms?
     
  15. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Fruit looks like a redbud's. I don't think it likes floodplain areas, but the books say river bottoms? I know the champ is in great soil in an old part of town, and that the tree won't stand new subdivisions with their hard-packed clay.
    I think it's more delicate than a dogwood about sun and soil.
    The only ones I know that do well are protected from the afternoon sun, and are in old yards (hence better soil).
    I think it's an interesting alternative to dogwoods in a woodland setting, plus it flowers later than other trees, so you extend the spring show by a month.
    I'll bet it's in more areas than any of us know, it's just that we aren't walking the woods right now. In another month, it'll look like a small ash with smooth bark!
     
  16. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    [rquote=1272746&tid=88977&author=UrbanHunter]Fruit looks like a redbud's. I don't think it likes floodplain areas, but the books say river bottoms? I know the champ is in great soil in an old part of town, and that the tree won't stand new subdivisions with their hard-packed clay.
    I think it's more delicate than a dogwood about sun and soil.
    The only ones I know that do well are protected from the afternoon sun, and are in old yards (hence better soil).
    I think it's an interesting alternative to dogwoods in a woodland setting, plus it flowers later than other trees, so you extend the spring show by a month.
    I'll bet it's in more areas than any of us know, it's just that we aren't walking the woods right now. In another month, it'll look like a small ash with smooth bark![/rquote]


    It sounds like I need a few of them :cheers:

    If you run across any seeds I would like to swap ya for something.
     
  17. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Good idea! I'll collect a bunch for everyone that wants some.:cheers:
     
  18. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    Good stuff. I havent come across this but found this on a quick google.
    I thought it was curious as to the limited distribution in MO.

    This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Peoria, Illinois
    Clermont, Kentucky
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Georgetown, Kentucky
    Hi Hat, Kentucky
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Louisville, Kentucky (2 reports)
    Nicholasville, Kentucky (2 reports)
    Paris, Kentucky
    Smiths Grove, Kentucky
    Versailles, Kentucky
    Thompsonville, Michigan
    Cape Girardeau, Missouri
    Independence, Missouri
    Piedmont, Missouri
    Fairport, New York
    Rochester, New York
    Watertown, New York
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Lake Oswego, Oregon
    Schwenksville, Pennsylvania
    Everett, Washington