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We went last year after the deer season, killed one had a couple encounters, just too far for our set-ups (gun wise)....the guys that were over for dinner and drinks in the evening mentioned we were a 1-2 weeks late form the "seeking" if you will. My question is the coyote rut in progress and what is the ballpark time frames.....or is this BS and just go hunt them when you can?
 

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Within the next week or 2, they will really start looking for love. They are really already in the seeking phase. If you want to kill a coyote, do this exactly.
Start with a female invitation howl or long howl, basically the same thing. It’s a friendly howl, basically says hey I’m here, is anyone else. You’ll either get an answer howl or you won’t, most times you won’t. Wait 3-4 minutes, and throw out another howl from a different female, short howls, coyotes don’t howl for 30 seconds or a minute or 6 minutes. They say hello and shut up. Wait several more minutes and do a serenade, mom/pup works really well, but any serenade will do. You should be about 10-12 minutes into the set at this time. Wait several more minutes after the serenade. If you got an answer to either of the first 2 howls, respond back with a slightly more aggressive female howl, but not a full blown challenge howl yet. The reason for that is you are calling to different types of dogs and they will be at all different distances. They will hear you from a mile away and they can pinpoint the sound to within 30 yards. You’ll have an alpha pair, those are the dominant dogs and the ones that reproduce within the family unit. They are also the most territorial. However, there will also be beta dogs, younger and not the dominant pair. You challenge those dogs and you will likely scare them away. The more submissive dogs do not want to get their azz kicked. But they’ll respond and come to friendlier howls. So, back to the howl, if you get an answer howl, give them a little more agitated and excited invite howl and then shut the fk up. They will come. Wait. Silence is deadly on a coyote set. If you get no response from anything (the howls and serenade) and haven’t seen anything yet, at this time of year, go into estrous chirps or female whimpers. Those are both breeding sounds and call in a ton of dogs during breeding season. It will work now. Normally, I’d go with prey distress at this point, but by now, coyotes have heard every rabbit sound there is and they wise up to it, so pick something different. Bird distress, woodpecker is a good one, vole squeaks, mouse squeaks, things like that. One of the hottest sounds right now is coyote-**** fight. I called in 3 dogs last week on that sound. Grey Fox distress is another good one that not as many people use and coyotes want to kill the **** out of foxes. If you’ve seen nothing yet, go into fights. Really any coyote fight will do, but breeding fights will work the best right now. You can also start challenge howls at this point and if the alpha pair has ignored you so far, they’ll come to the challenge. I just don’t like doing it earlier in the set, because of the more submissive dogs. But an alpha male will come to a male challenge and defend his female. The last call I try is a pup distress, this will work a lot of times when nothing else will. If you haven’t seen a coyote after doing all this, either move to where the coyotes are, or buy a better ecaller. :)

It’s of utmost importance to use the wind. You can sometimes fool a deer’s nose, you will never ever, ever fool a coyotes nose. Don’t worry about cover scent, don’t worry about attractant scent. Wind in your face is good, crosswind is absolute best. Coyotes will almost always circle downwind to smell what they are hearing and seeing. Make sure you can always see your downwind side and don’t give them a way to escape (brush, hill, etc). If possible, keep the sun at your back and set up in the shadows. Stay still, move when they coyote is moving. If he’s sitting still, he’s looking. If you move, he’ll see it. Wait until the coyote is walking or trotting to move to get into position for a shot. When you get multiple coyotes in, don’t necessarily take the easy one and don’t take the Hail Mary shot at the far one either, but if you can, try and kill the smaller of the pair. That’s the female and a male does not like to leave the female. He will either stick around and run a ways and look back. You can stop them by giving them a good whoop, they’ll give you a few seconds before they take off again, especially if you’re shooting suppressed. As soon as you shoot, turn on pup distress and turn on loud. That will stop the second a lot of times, keep one close or even call one back into you. Dress as if you’re Turkey hunting, keep your face covered and good luck. You ever want me to take you out, just holler.
 

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Perfect Ben thanks! If I can find some of the closer spots you will get the call! I know we are going to the IL farm and I really cant bring folks.
 

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Wow, that is a lot of good information. I need to see what my e-caller is capable of, not sure it has all those sounds.
 
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I’ll also add. I used to run 15-20 minute sets, but kept seeing dogs as I was pulling away. Frustrating as fk to call for 20 minutes, pack up all my stuff, and see one in the field I was just calling as i was pulling away in the truck or 4 wheeler. Since I started extending my sets, my success rate skyrocketed. I’ve killed way more dogs at 30 mins or later than I ever did in under 20 minutes. It still happens, but not nearly as much. Last 4 dogs I’ve called in were 12 minutes, 32 mins, 38 mins and 48 mins. The dog at 48 mins…I was sitting in a deer blind. Called for 35 minutes. Drove my truck to the caller, picked it up, drove 350 yards to the corner of the field where I had a trap set. See there’s a grinner, load a .22 rifle, shoot the grinner, look up and see a coyote standing right under the blind I was sitting in. It helps to know where the coyotes are, but if you’re pretty certain they are there, don’t rush. Quality over quantity any day. Keep your calling 50-75 yards from you.

Coyotes either want food, to fock or to fight. It’s just a matter of which sound trips their trigger but one of them will.
 

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Perfect Ben thanks! If I can find some of the closer spots you will get the call! I know we are going to the IL farm and I really cant bring folks.
You’re more than welcome to come with me sometime. My spot is 2.5 hours north, right around pinwheels place actually if you’ve been up there, but I have probably 10k acres I have permission on. I’ll put you on coyotes and teach you everything you need to know. I’ve gotten into this the past few years and I’m totally ate up with it. Lol. I like it every bit as much as deer hunting.
 

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Wow, that is a lot of good information. I need to see what my e-caller is capable of, not sure it has all those sounds.
What caller do you have? They are definitely not all created equal.

I used a primos alpha dogg for a few years before upgrading to a lucky duck roughneck. I killed dogs with the alpha dogg, but the roughneck was almost unfair to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ll also add. I used to run 15-20 minute sets, but kept seeing dogs as I was pulling away. Frustrating as fk to call for 20 minutes, pack up all my stuff, and see one in the field I was just calling as i was pulling away in the truck or 4 wheeler. Since I started extending my sets, my success rate skyrocketed. I’ve killed way more dogs at 30 mins or later than I ever did in under 20 minutes. It still happens, but not nearly as much. Last 4 dogs I’ve called in were 12 minutes, 32 mins, 38 mins and 48 mins. The dog at 48 mins…I was sitting in a deer blind. Called for 35 minutes. Drove my truck to the caller, picked it up, drove 350 yards to the corner of the field where I had a trap set. See there’s a grinner, load a .22 rifle, shoot the grinner, look up and see a coyote standing right under the blind I was sitting in. It helps to know where the coyotes are, but if you’re pretty certain they are there, don’t rush. Quality over quantity any day. Keep your calling 50-75 yards from you.

Coyotes either want food, to fock or to fight. It’s just a matter of which sound trips their trigger but one of them will.
unfortunately the IL farm seems loaded with yotes!
 

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thanks again for the tutorial, i know that took some time!!
No worries pal. I tried to tag you on a FB group, but couldn’t figure out which was you and didn’t want to tag some treehugger. Lol

Paul, I tagged you. Join that group and watch some of the live hunts. This dude is awesome, Missouri guy too and hunts Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Illinois…places with similar terrain. Heath baker, predator tactics. I’ve learned more from him than anywhere else. Also has excellent sounds for a fairly good price. Rick paillet is another one with great sounds. Verminatorpc, that’s who I bought my roughneck from.
 

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You’re more than welcome to come with me sometime. My spot is 2.5 hours north, right around pinwheels place actually if you’ve been up there, but I have probably 10k acres I have permission on. I’ll put you on coyotes and teach you everything you need to know. I’ve gotten into this the past few years and I’m totally ate up with it. Lol. I like it every bit as much as deer hunting.
You ever get down to the Paris area around Mark Twain Lake? We have been covered in them this year and they are still showing up almost every day on the cams
 

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@gentleben sounds like we could be friends!!

I absolutely love to predator hunt. Started around 2004, learned most of my tactics from @MOGC and it's been on since. I do use alot of vocals this time of year, but sounds like my terrain is a little different than Ben's.

I mostly hunt woods, not many fields where I am at, plus I use a shotgun cause I mostly hunt on the Fort and rifles are not allowed. For me, terrain features sorta like hunting deer come into play.

I run a mixture of ecall sounds and hand call.

My son is coming home for the weekend from Springfield, so I am hoping we get a few stands in. Good luck and if any of yall need a partner, let me know.
 

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How much distance between sets ?
Is public land worth trying?
Depends on the terrain. You might be able to call every couple hundred yards if you are in woods and hilly terrain. Or might have to travel miles if you have wide open terrain.

Like Ben said, watch the wind. If the wind is blowing towards the cover that you think the coyotes are in, I dont waste my time and educate them. I go somewhere else.

Definitely public land. Especially wooded. I'm sure every field in public has been called, but all the public MTNF down here dont have any fields, and I dont think much pressure.
 

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@gentleben sounds like we could be friends!!



I mostly hunt woods, not many fields where I am at, plus I use a shotgun cause I mostly hunt on the Fort and rifles are not allowed. For me, terrain features sorta like hunting deer come into play.
I hunt terrain that's 50/50 but seldom get coyote to cross fields like you see on TV. What terrain features are you looking for in heavy woods. I feel that is my weakness.
 

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I hunt terrain that's 50/50 but seldom get coyote to cross fields like you see on TV. What terrain features are you looking for in heavy woods. I feel that is my weakness.
Let's say you have a ridge top that runs north to south. Wind is coming from the north, so I am following the top with the wind in my face. To the east and west, every holler, little saddle, bench, is probably going to the thicker bottom. A coyote will follow those terrain features because they fill safe, not in the wide open, more than likely, not to worried about getting downwind of ya. I like to set up about 30 yards from the crest, so when he pops up, he is in range, and hasnt seen me.

Old roads have been good to me also. Bluffs that keep the coyote from sneaking around ya help also.
 

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what time of day works best? evenings or mornings? if mornings do you mean at daylight?
I've called them at all parts of the day, but probably have better luck in the morning, but that may be I have hunted more in the mornings. If they are hungry or in the mood, they can be called. If not hungry or in the mood, they will stay napping and ignore you.
 
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