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I've seen some rotary tillers with seeders on ebay. A guy in Milan, MO sells them. I've thought about buying one but don't know if it's one of those things you want but don't need.

I have 11 acres in food plots. About 6 of it is in alfalfa or clover so only 5 of it is in annuals. I have a disc and broadcast seeder.

Would I be wasting my money ($2600) or would it be worthwhile? I'm leaning toward not buying it but will if it makes sense.

What do you think?
 

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I know they come in handy especially with small seeds to get the soil worked up to a fine powder. You will get great stands from that using a broadcast seeder. If you have the money, it would come in handy, but is not a necessity with all the other stuff you have.

A cultipacker or roller would be something else to add to your wish list to aid with your other equipment :cheers:
 

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I'd like to have one. Never used one, but sure love the seedbed they prepare. I've seen a fella that uses a rotary tiller and pulls behind a cultipacker after the tiller then plants. Tillers fluff the soil quite a bit, so it'll work well for grains, but may fluff a bit too much for small seed like clover, turnips, etc. That's where the cultipacker will come in handy.

I've heard about an acre and hour for a 6' tiller for time estimates. Also, I'm not sure how well it would work if you were trying to work up grassy areas. I asked that question here a while back and the reply was that I would spend alot of time cutting grass out of the tines.
 

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yup MD, not good in grassy stands. and just a bit of soils info to go with this post. this tiller as stated will powderize the soil.....is this good..??? not really, it looks good but by doing this it totally destroys the structure of the soil, or the way moisture naturally moves through it. this also allows it to dry out much faster. one reason why farmers till so it will dry so they can plant sooner. erosion on this can be bad as well, on slopes runoff will cut ruts, rills, and worse depending on the precipitation event, a hard rain will compact the ground and crust it over, little seeds have a hard time commin through it. time for lunch..:claphands:
 

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My dad has a pullversiser or how ever you spell it. He uses on yards to make a seed bed, works very good. It has a heavy roller on it with studs hanging off the roller, then behind it you have a rake. I'm gonna try to use on my plots this year
 

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I have a 2 bottom plow, disk and roto-tiller. Don't care that much for roto tilling food plots. It's just to slow. For $2600 I'd consider buying 2-4 other used toys. :cheers:
 
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