Reloading...

Discussion in 'Reloading Tips & Tricks' started by Lefty, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. Lefty

    Lefty New Member

    Jun 29, 2004
    MO
    OK...

    So I'm a little interested in reloading now.

    So tell me: how much would it cost me to grea started?
    And what would I need to buy?

    :withstupid:
     
  2. kcraider21

    kcraider21 New Member

    504
    Aug 17, 2005
    Belton, MO
    My dad and I have a reloading station set up, but I don't know a whole lot on the cost. My dad bought most of it used, so he got it pretty reasonable. Some of the reloading stuff can get pretty expensive. But if you like guns and hunting it is another way you can participate in those things during the offseason and down time.
     

  3. Hoytshooter

    Hoytshooter Active Member

    Mar 7, 2005
    Small Buck, MO
    The initial cost to get into reloading will be a few hundred I would imagine, depending on how many different and which calibers you are going to reload. You can pick up a kit with everything you need for about $250, or buy it pice by pice and look for deals. If you just want to get into it and see if you like it you can save alot of money by getting a regular scale as opposed to digital and not buying the "fancy" stuff. After that the reloading die sets vary in price, anywhere from about $25 oto $75 dollars. Then depending on what caliber you shoot bulk casings range in prices if you buy empties. Bullets are generally around $20 give or take for most calibers but can cost quite a bit more if you are wanting competition or specialty bullets. The powder isn't bad, $15-$20 or so unless you are buying in bulk, more than a pound at a time. A pound of powder loads a lot of rounds! Primers are around $20.
    You can get alot of money invested buy you can also load a bunch of shells. I've never actually figured up the cost per load or box as compared to factory. I don't imagine it's alot cheaper, but the great thing about reloading is the ability to custom your loads and get the best out of your rifle.
     
  4. glennasher1

    glennasher1 Well-Known Member

    Sep 16, 2004
    Radcliff, KY
    I'd look for one of those RCBS Rockchucker kits, they come with almost all the goodies you'll need, and at a reasonable price. They hold value, last several lifetimes, and have an unimpeachable warranty. Lee has a kit, too, but it's not the quality that RCBS is, and their warranty sucks. With the RCBS kit, all you'll need are dies and a shellholder, plus components, of course. You may want to add a few accessories for more convenience later, but there'll be all kinds of time for that, since the 'Chucker will last forever.
    I just read a post over on the .204 board where a guy in Australia broke his Lee press, and is getting it welded up. Imagine the headaches of getting warranty work done, in his case! He recommends the RCBS, for some reason!
    I use a Rockchucker, myself, and have a Dillon 550B for pistols and volumne loading, it makes the work pretty easy when you have good tools.
     
  5. glennasher1

    glennasher1 Well-Known Member

    Sep 16, 2004
    Radcliff, KY
  6. danceswithbooze

    danceswithbooze New Member

    Jul 16, 2005
    O\'Fallon
    Although I'm thinking of getting into it, I've never loaded pistol or rifle rounds, so I can't speak to the joys or benefits of reloading those types of rounds. But I can speak to shot gun shells.

    If you shoot a LOT of shotgun shells reloading can save you a LOT of money. The economics of reloading shotgun shells doesnt make sence if you just plan to target plink and hunt. However, if you are into trap or skeet and shout a couple hundred shells per weekend it is well worth your while to get into reloading.

    Yes, there are reasons other than financial to get into it such as have been mentioned above (custom loads, enjoyment...) but if your doing it to save money you have to shoot a lot before it pays off.
     
  7. Landlover

    Landlover Active Member

    Jan 10, 2006
    Springfield, MO
    I think that part of the fun to reloading is the pride you have when a load you built shoots a great group or animal. I reload all of my own shells and build my own arrows. I don't get too into the aesthetics of making them look beautiful, but only care about performance. I am excited to learn more from you guys!

    I was lucky enough to have a father, like KCraider, that bought all of the stuff. We have a RCBS and I have used a Lee and I can tell you to go with the RCBS.
     
  8. I have to agree with glennasher go ahead and do it right and buy the RCBS press. But as far as dies you can buy lee die set cheap. They come with everything you need for each caliber includung your shell holder. There alot cheaper and seem to be good dies. I cant think right now what there called but there in a red round container about the size of an oil filter. I bought most of the stuff i had off e-bay. I dont really like buying stuff off there but you can get good buys on the small stuff like dies and powder measures and stuff. And when i got into it they had some Great prices on new in the box rcbs kits. And hoytshooter when you were talking about not ever figuring up the cost,i did on my 300 win mag. I was giving anywere from 26 to 30 a box. And i was reloading them for about 8 a box if i remember right.

    chad
     
  9. Big John

    Big John New Member

    Oct 24, 2003
    CHeck out e-bay there is a reloading starter kit I think it was for $89.99 you will need to get dies for the calibers you want to reload but it looks like a good deal to me.
     
  10. kcraider21

    kcraider21 New Member

    504
    Aug 17, 2005
    Belton, MO
    I agree with Landlover it is cool to go out and shoot some tight groups with the loads you have made yourself.:)
     
  11. Lefty

    Lefty New Member

    Jun 29, 2004
    MO
    Thanks for all the info everyone!!
    :cheers::cheers:

    For now I'll be shooting factory loads, but in the futurw when I get more money and time I'll definatly look hard into the RCBS stuff!
    Thnaks agian all!
     
  12. winger

    winger New Member

    Oct 24, 2003
    learn from my mistake. i got the lee anniversary kit because i was not going to do many reloads, i just wanted a way to have good rounds at a decent price for my 7 mag. talk about a pricey piece of shooting.:mad: of course the bug hit me and i wanted to load for everything. i had the lee anniversary kit. once i started for all my rifles, it was time to uprgrade. the lee did the work but the rcbs set up is much better. the press itself is worth the switch for me. lee was not bad just a cheaper product and it showed with the amount of work i had to do vs the amount of work the equipment did. imo. if you do go with the lee product, i would highly suggest useing rcbs dies. once they are set they are set. lee's use flimsy rings which must be messed with on a constant base.
     
  13. Hoytshooter

    Hoytshooter Active Member

    Mar 7, 2005
    Small Buck, MO
    I'll second everyone else, I also use the RCBS equipment and it has never failed.
    However...I generally use lee dies and havn't ever had a problem with them. They are cheap and I actually prefer them over the rcbs dies. Not sure exactly why.
     
  14. glennasher1

    glennasher1 Well-Known Member

    Sep 16, 2004
    Radcliff, KY
    Lee carbide pistol dies are thoroughly excellent, but I've had some lemons in their rifle dies. That goes with Lyman and Hornady, too, though:eek:. In fairness to Hornady, a phone call got me going again in no time (Parts on the way!) Redding dies are the Cadillacs of "normally priced dies" with RCBS being the tricked out Buicks (Nice, but the wrong nameplate on 'em). That said, I've loaded nearly a QUARTER MILLION .45 ACP rounds with the same set of RCBS carbide dies, good stuff! Buy the best you can possibly afford, it's cheaper in the long run. As they say "Buy once, cry once". Dillon sells great pistol dies (made by Redding!) Most are good, some are "better" but try to get the best you can.
     
  15. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    Oct 5, 2005
    Saint Charles, MO
    Also, Busch Range offers free reloading classes...
     
  16. Big John

    Big John New Member

    Oct 24, 2003
    Have both RCBS and Hornady custom-grade New dimension dies.
     
  17. Lefty

    Lefty New Member

    Jun 29, 2004
    MO
    Hmm... I didn't know that!

    Have you taken the course, or has anyone else on here taken the course?
    If so, what does the student have to bring/supply?
     
  18. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    Oct 5, 2005
    Saint Charles, MO
    You bring yourself! I have not takin it yet but it will be on this years schedule along with muzzle loader classes....