Reading soil test

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by mattd78, May 9, 2018.

  1. mattd78

    mattd78 Active Member

    456
    Jul 12, 2013
    I have no idea what this indicates what I need. I know I need to get pH right first, but how much lime on 3/4a.

    Also surprised it dosent show nitrogen.

    IMG_3705.jpg
     
  2. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    The ENM number (1480 in your case) determines the amount of limestone needed. When you purchase limestone, there will be a purity index associated with it. Divide your required ENM by the purity of the material you are getting and you will get a number in tons per acre.
    For example, if you need 1480 and the purity is say 600, then 1480/600=2.46 tons of that material needed per acre. Since you are only doing 3/4 acre, then 2.46*0.75=1.85 tons needed.
    Adjusting the pH will probably free up some of the macro and micro nutrients. I'd get another soil test done maybe next year after this years liming has had a chance to react... see where your pH is and stuff then.
     

  3. gurgalunas

    gurgalunas Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2013
    Platte City
    ENM is a measure of the neutralizing "strength" of a given lime source. A 40# bag may have 12 ENM, for example. You just need to apply enough bags so your ENMs add up to what is needed.

    The tested levels of various things show in the top 2/3 of the page. The bottom 1/3 says what to add.

    N is listed at the bottom of the printout. Recommended application of 35 lbs/ac. Remember that # is actual ingredient (N), not lbs of fertilizer. Urea is 46% (46-0-0) pure N, so a 50 lb. bag would have 23 pounds of actual N. Same goes for P and K. The #s on fert bag are (%N)-(%P)-(%K), and since % is parts per 100, you gotta do the math to convert to lbs per bag.

    Also, recommendations are made "per acre". If only doing 3/4 ac, do the math to get amount needed.

    Edit- rat was quicker on the draw...
     
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  4. mattd78

    mattd78 Active Member

    456
    Jul 12, 2013
    I’ve always just used the bags of pulverized lime from tractor supply. Not getting anything else back there. Their website dosent show ENM. I’ll have to go in and check.

    Also, just spreading on top. Not tilling in. Does that change the amount?
     
  5. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    It doesnt change the amount needed but it will change the time for reaction. Incorporating it will speed up the amendment and make it less prone to runoff. Some bagged lime will give a recommendation in terms of square foot coverage but it wont be exact to what the soil test is requiring. Nothing is exact in soils anyway :)
     
  6. beanpile

    beanpile just a no body

    seems I did an ENM type calculation one time..IIRC it was like 720 which is awfully good lime and being as fine as it is It also seems to act fastr that your basic grade Ag lime from the quarry
     
  7. gurgalunas

    gurgalunas Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2013
    Platte City
    I limed this year. Got to borrow one of the spreader trucks from the snow company I used to work for. Worked pretty slick, but it's a good thing the spreader has the vibrating bin to get all that fine material to fall to the bottom. I think the ENM was 540 from our nearest quarry, which isn't too bad.

    There are some lime bags that don't list ENM, but other measurements instead. Seems like I had to google it all and do some sort of conversions when I was looking a few years back. Keep an eye on the ads for sales, and if you order a whole pallet, they will often give you an additional discount. That's at TSC at least.
     
  8. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    Craig.. some of those bagged lime materials dont have ENM but will give a recommendation in pounds/1000sq ft depending on what your starting pH is. I think most of them give that recommendatin with a goal of 6.5pH in the end. These would be more like garden lime materials and would be VERY expensive to use to amend a few acres.
     
  9. gurgalunas

    gurgalunas Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2013
    Platte City
    Yeah, its been several years since I was exploring options. Don't recall the specifics, but remember thinking "why can't everyone use the same terminology...". Nothing is ever simple.

    And the price is why postponed and finally got it done this year. Couldn't stomach the cost of bags for 3 acres of 5.1 pH soil... Just had to convince my buddies with the trucks that they needed to lime their plots. "Oh, and while you have the truck out..."
     
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  10. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    Its a messy job, I know that. Wind is definately a factor... reminds me of that scene in The Big Lebowski when they are scattering Donnys ashes :D
     
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  11. mattd78

    mattd78 Active Member

    456
    Jul 12, 2013
    Will a quarry put it in my half ton bed?

    Even then I’d drive it to cabin. Then shovel into a small garden trailer and atv it up to the plot. Have to be a decent savings.
     
  12. farmnhunt

    farmnhunt Well-Known Member

    Jun 6, 2006
    Lebanon
     
  13. farmnhunt

    farmnhunt Well-Known Member

    Jun 6, 2006
    Lebanon
    I have done this when doing cost share on ponds and needed 1000# of lime. Its work but you do save dollars most quarries will load it in your truck or trailer.
     
  14. mattd78

    mattd78 Active Member

    456
    Jul 12, 2013
    The bag at menards says 1757 ECCE per ton. The internet says this is the same as ENM.

    If so, I’d need .63 tons to hit my requirement. Or 25 bags @ $5 a bag. Any idea how much it is from the quarry for a half ton dropped in my pickup?

    Probably the equivalent of getting a yard of gravel from the material store versus buying the same amount in bags.

    IMG_3713.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2018
  15. beanpile

    beanpile just a no body

    lowes has separate price if you buy more that 10 bags.. I think its called the "Contractor pice" and if your registered on their Military discount you'll get another 10% off
     
  16. gurgalunas

    gurgalunas Well-Known Member

    Jan 3, 2013
    Platte City
    Also lists ENP below for Ohio. Dumb how each state uses different terminology...

    I think I paid $16 per ton at the quarry for 540 ENM lime.
     
  17. farmnhunt

    farmnhunt Well-Known Member

    Jun 6, 2006
    Lebanon
    It cost me $10 for them to drop part of a scoop on my trailer
     
  18. CRE10

    CRE10 No to Drugs Yes to Hugs

    Nov 18, 2013
    In a barn
    Up here it cost me $16 a ton delivered and spread for acreage, but of course doing 3/4 an acre they will want more.