question

Discussion in 'Blood Trailing.....OPT IN>>>>>>>' started by yankee, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. yankee

    yankee Senior Member

    say im in the middle of nowhere, with an arrowed Deer someplace near by, but at first blood my mind is saying call a tracker, i know theres 1000's of scenarios but on the basis of just setting up the basics

    whats the do's/don'ts when contacting a tracker for the first time, also whats the proper questions to ask a tracker to know you have a legitimte tracker/dog on the other end

    by setting up the basics im refering to a first time caller to a unknown tracker, UBT lists a few in Michigan Non of which are near me whatsoever, but that doesn't matter..

    i want the whats,wheres,whens,whys,hows.. if you follow what im saying, only reason i ask is i was involved with a couple of arrowed deer by friends a couple seasons back, and they called some tracker with a dog, paid 300.00 twice, 2 shooters 2 deer 2 different days same tracker zero deer recovered, now im familiar with dog bahavior on scents, i have owned my fair share of pointers for pheasant hunting, and his dog IMO never connected with the scent nor did it do any nose to the ground hunting, am i off base here???

    what key questions would one ask over the phone?????
     
  2. doctorbrady

    doctorbrady Doctorbrady

    90
    Oct 21, 2013
    SW MO
    Great question! Anyone with a dog can be "a tracker," but as with everything else some are better than others.
    First, some important things for the hunter to remember to aid in the recovery of a wounded deer:
    If the shot is the least bit questionable, get quietly out of the woods to avoid pushing the deer. If it is a leg hit you want to get on it very quickly, otherwise sit in the stand for at least 45 minutes, then slip quietly out. You may QUIETLY do a cursory look for blood or your arrow if it passed through, but any more than that you risk pushing and losing your deer. That said, the Missouri Wildlife Code says that you must exhaust all efforts before using a tracking dog. I'm just telling you what improves your chances of recovery. Secondly, replay the shot in your head immediately. Be honest in your assessment, high, low, too far forward, too far back? Most hunters are overly optimistic about their shot when replaying it to others. Being honest with yourself and a potential tracker will save you both time, money and frustration. Remember, if you hit him perfectly you wouldn't need a tracker. Thirdly, if you do look for sign and find some, mark it clearly. No one should hunt without something to mark sign (flagging tape, toilet paper, etc). Trust me, you will have a hard time finding it later and will waste valuable time while muddying up the scent. Next, if you do start off on the track watch where you step. It is nearly impossible to search an area without dragging microscopic blood and scent particles around. The more you do it, the harder it is for the dog later. If searching, disturb as little as possible with as few people as possible. Next, call a tracker at the first indication that things aren't looking good. Time is of the essence, as the tracker is probably not sitting by the phone awaiting your call and may have to work you in to his day...or night.
    Now, what about the tracker? Ask pointed questions about how many real tracks he has taken for others. What is his success rate? Legitimate trackers will have a success rate between 25-50%, with 30% being the average for good, seasoned trackers using dogs on lead. If he tells you it's 75%, run away! He's just not being honest. I personally know many of the best trackers in the country, and none of them run that kind of success. Also, if they do not interview about the shot itself, they either just want your money or are very inexperienced. Secondly, ask the tracker if he has completed any of the United Blood Trackers certifications. It is not essential, but if he has passed a UBT exam, his dog is legit. Alternately, they may have passed a German 20 or 40 hr test. Finally, ask for references. Experienced trackers will have them most times. Be sure you know what fees are expected when he shows up. Then be realistic with the tracker. You (or your friend) made the poor shot. Not the tracker it is not his fault ultimately if the deer is not recovered. It is yours. What a good tracker affords you is a 30% higher chance of recovering a marginally placed shot. Hope this helps.
     

  3. yankee

    yankee Senior Member

    got ya, thanks for the response.. am i right to assume blood trackers will respond to scent similarily to say my shorthairs do to birds???
     
  4. doctorbrady

    doctorbrady Doctorbrady

    90
    Oct 21, 2013
    SW MO
    Different types of dogs respond differently. Some are calm, concentrated and keep their noses tight to the ground. Others run tracks head up and cut back and forth winding the scent in the air, so it is hard to say without knowing the dog.
     
  5. yankee

    yankee Senior Member

    i have a pretty good sense when dogs are IN the hunt, this trackers dog well the word that comes to mind... lackadazical (sp?) thats how i read him anyway, and it just got me to wondering you know IF he took my friends for 600.00