Please Report Dead Deer

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by MDC Deer, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    An exceptionally wet spring and the dry unseasonably warm weather with very little rain we are currently experiencing may be setting the stage for a significant epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) outbreak, particularly south of the Missouri River. We've already had reports of a couple EHD suspect deer.

    Please report any dead deer that you find to your local conservation agent or send me a u2u. The extent of EHD outbreaks are difficult to track without good reporting from those in the field in late summer and early fall.
     
  2. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Will they tend to be close to water?
     

  3. rockchucker

    rockchucker Senior Member

    Nov 29, 2007
    Wentzville Mo.
    yes.

    just follow the buzzards
     
  4. Beck59

    Beck59 New Member

    146
    Jun 30, 2011
    can you tell if they are sick before they die?
     
  5. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    [rquote=2185198&tid=152649&author=UrbanHunter]Will they tend to be close to water?[/rquote]

    Yes the virus causes a severe fever and internal hemorrhaging that typically causes them to seek out water as relief from the fever. Usually the only outward signs you will see is if you happen to stumble across one that has become mostly debilitated form dehydration and fever. They do express a lose of fear of humans, lose of appetite, rapid respiration, excessive salivation, and general weakening. It is typically a very fast acting virus with deer developing signs of infection about 7 days after exposure and usually dying within 8-36 hours.

    When an infected deer frequents a water hole (or dies there) the biting midges take blood meals and then transmit the virus to other deer that frequent the watering hole.

    Wet springs and dry summers create ideal conditions for the midge to reproduce in large numbers. As water holes dry up in late summer due to lack of rain and high temperatures it concentrates deer around limited water sources. The concentration of animals increasing the risk of spreading EHD from infected deer to uninfected deer via the biting midge.
     
  6. MO Deer Slayer

    MO Deer Slayer New Member

    Nov 14, 2007
    bean field near you
    And only way to stop them is the frost I don't like the sound of this
     
  7. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    [rquote=2185433&tid=152649&author=MO Deer Slayer]And only way to stop them is the frost I don't like the sound of this [/rquote]

    yep...we've made it through dry spells before lets hope we can do it again.
     
  8. Cook

    Cook Well-Known Member

    May 28, 2003
    even one halfway up a tree?
     
  9. rockchucker

    rockchucker Senior Member

    Nov 29, 2007
    Wentzville Mo.
    it seems to me that it affects adult deer more than yearlings or fawns. howard and randolph counties got hit hard last year.
     
  10. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    [rquote=2185562&tid=152649&author=rockchucker]it seems to me that it affects adult deer more than yearlings or fawns. howard and randolph counties got hit hard last year.[/rquote]

    bachelor groups of bucks appear to be extremely vulerable as well, which makes since because if they are traveling together in small groups throught the summer and one gets the virus its likely to be transmitted to the rest.
     
  11. Hawk

    Hawk Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Oct 15, 2009
    Is there any treatment for this, such as insecticide around waterholes or something to be put in the water to kill the virus? When you say waterhole, do you mean a pond or just a puddle? Does the size of the pond matter, or is it just the insects around any water that is the problem? Would you recommend moving a dead deer if you found one?
     
  12. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    Hawk, Great questions. There is no treatment and since it's basically any water body that may have insects around treatment with inceticides to kill the midge is nearly impossible. They breed in the mud flats that are created by high water receeding. I wouldn't bother moving a carcass as the virus usually dies within 24-36 hours inside the dead host and only on rare occasions are you going to find it in time. the only option you might have would be to bury a fresh carcass. If you move a carcass all you have done is spread the virus to a new location. So I'd just leave it be.
     
  13. Hawk

    Hawk Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Oct 15, 2009
    Good info...:cheers:

    So spraying the mudflats from a boat probably wouldnt have much effect? The reason I ask is we have 4 ponds on our property and only 2 of them have exposed mud flats. I could treat all exposed mud in a couple hours, but if they are breeding IN the mud it probably wouldnt help. Do they also breed in moving water like creeks? If someone were to find a fresh dead deer near water would a "viking funeral" be appropriate??
     
  14. oneshot 1

    oneshot 1 Well-Known Member

    Jun 11, 2003
    Ozarks
    I'm thinking this is why we see larger number of Deer around Large Bodies of water because they are less effected.

    In the past I have come up on Deer laying in the water just their Heads out.If an area gets hit hard couple times its hard for them to recover to former numbers :whinging:

    oneshot
     
  15. NEMOBowhunter

    NEMOBowhunter Member

    194
    Oct 4, 2010
    NEMO
    Have there been many deer reported yet this year?
     
  16. MDC Deer

    MDC Deer New Member

    798
    Dec 9, 2009
    [rquote=2220961&tid=152649&author=NEMOBowhunter]Have there been many deer reported yet this year?
    [/rquote]

    We have had a few reports from various parts of the state that appear to be the normal low level mortality that annually occurs this time of year. Certainly no hotspots appearing to this point. Talked with some folks in Kentucky and they are seeing a little bit of EHD in western Kentucky and some popping up in eastern Kansas, but nothing to be overerly concerned about to this point.
     
  17. normanvalleyoutdoors

    normanvalleyoutdoors New Member

    62
    May 20, 2012
    not what i wanted to hear about tonight....
     
  18. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    [rquote=2534196&tid=152649&author=normanvalleyoutdoors]not what i wanted to hear about tonight....[/rquote]

    This was last years outbreak in a few areas. Little early for this year.
     
  19. Rack_Hunter

    Rack_Hunter Sensitivity Aficionado

    [rquote=2534218&tid=152649&author=henry][rquote=2534196&tid=152649&author=normanvalleyoutdoors]not what i wanted to hear about tonight....[/rquote]

    This was last years outbreak in a few areas. Little early for this year.[/rquote]

    If you saw the Palmer drought index for Missouri, you might be surprised, most of the state is in severe drought

    LINK
     
  20. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    [rquote=2534220&tid=152649&author=Rack_Hunter][rquote=2534218&tid=152649&author=henry][rquote=2534196&tid=152649&author=normanvalleyoutdoors]not what i wanted to hear about tonight....[/rquote]

    This was last years outbreak in a few areas. Little early for this year.[/rquote]

    If you saw the Palmer drought index for Missouri, you might be surprised, most of the state is in severe drought

    LINK[/rquote]

    What I was refering to was that its alittle early for ehd deaths to start showing up. I think they are not likely to start popping up till late july at the earliest. Usually later august is more like it.