Planting Milo and Millet - need suggestions

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by buxNdux, May 22, 2009.

  1. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    Just got some wgf milo and jap millet the other day to plant in our duck marshes. Not gonna plant the millet until July/August, but need to get the milo in sooner. Never have planted it before so looking for ideas on when to get it in. If I don't get it in this weekend, then I'll probably won't have a chance to plant until late june, is that too late?

    Any tips on planting are also welcome. We just started letting water off our marshes last week so the ground should be bare. Hopefully the water has been off the high ground long enough to let the soil dry out a little. Plan on discing with a cheap atv disc and broadcasting seed at 10-15 #/acre. Then either lightly discing it in or pulling a chain drag over it? Label says to plant at 1-1.5 inches, not sure if the chain drag will get it deep enough? Don?t have access to any other equipment.
     
  2. Modeerhunter

    Modeerhunter New Member

    Mar 7, 2007
    Gasconade County
    I would disc it in to get it deep enough. Go heavy on the nitrogen when applying fertilizer, milo is a nitrogen hog. I don't really know how late you can plant it but I'm sure somebody here does.
     

  3. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    Milo should do ok sown in june. I would try the disk and drag method. I always try to error on the side of too shallow instead of too deep. If your sowing the millet in the same stand you might want to back off the rate alittle.

    :cheers::cheers:
     
  4. Mastevt

    Mastevt Strutt Buster

    Apr 16, 2009
    Grain Valley
    I have planted it twice in years past that I was able to get into my food plot. Both times I used triple 13, spread the milo & T13 on with just a spreader on my tractor. once I disced it in, the other I used an old harrow drag. Both times it came up nice and thick. Both planting were in early June if I remember right. I got bottom ground with lots of moisture. If your ground is a little drier, I would disc in in, if it's a little wetter, I'd drag it in. After it was up good, about 2-3 ft in hieght, I disced stripped it. and kept those strips disced throught the summer and into fall. I could monitor deer movement in it that way, and it provided excellent dusting stations for the turkey. It got hammered by the deer and turkey. I sprayed 2-4-D on it ater it was up for weed control. Good luck. Hope this helps.
     
  5. nastyjack63

    nastyjack63 Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2006
    osage county
    We have planted cash crop milo as late as July 5th and got a crop (provided no early frosts). As for discing in if you have enough moisture it isn't necessary. Last year I planted a plot that would not dry out by just broadcasting on unworked ground a pulling a cultipacker over it. It was the best stand I had out of three plots that were in milo.
     
  6. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    Thanks for the input fellas. We just started draining our fields a week ago so I imagine that most of the ground is still going to be too wet or still under water. I think I'll try and plant a couple of the small higher spots with a couple of different methods and see which seems to work best...then come back in late june and plant the rest. Only going to be planting 3-4 acres total in milo. The millet won't be seeded with the milo either.

    I have some triple 13 laying around that i was going to throw on top. They told me when I got the seed not to throw fertilizer down until the milo was ~6" tall to let it get ahead of the weeds first. Should i do this or should i just throw it down when seeding and disc it in to the soil?

    Is it possible to get away without any weed control? I'd rather not have to mess with it and I don't mind some weeds coming up with the milo as long as they put on heads still. Being that this is mainly for ducks, I would actually prefer that it not be a pure milo stand, as if anything comes up it'll probably be smartweed and that would be a great combination. I just want to make sure the milo doesn't get crowded out by weeds and keep it from putting on seeds. Also keep in mind that wgf milo is a short variety that is only supposed to grow 24" to 30".

    :cheers:
     
  7. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    It will still head out even with weed competition. If the weeds get too heavy for your liking just brushog it before it starts to head out,,it will be capable of regrowth and putting on heads after mown if mown early enough. It will do better in drier conditions than your smart weed should,,so if you wait later to sow it it should jump out ahead of the smart weed.(.02)

    I should clarify that I have mown milo and had it head out afterwards only twice. I think it needs to be mown before it attempts to produce the shoot that the heads will grow on.

    :cheers::cheers:
     
  8. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    thanks henry. that's why I'm trying out milo instead of corn...a lot less money and maintenance required and from what i've read it will almost always put on heads regardless of competition.

    any more recommendations on the rate. I'd rather error on the thin side rather than the thick side. Don't want it to thick for the ducks to get into it and want them to be able to see the water from the air. 10#/acre? Less?

    I know, us puddle pirates do everything different :woot:
     
  9. Mastevt

    Mastevt Strutt Buster

    Apr 16, 2009
    Grain Valley
    [rquote=1272711&tid=89067&author=buxNdux]thanks henry. that's why I'm trying out milo instead of corn...a lot less money and maintenance required and from what i've read it will almost always put on heads regardless of competition.

    any more recommendations on the rate. I'd rather error on the thin side rather than the thick side. Don't want it to thick for the ducks to get into it and want them to be able to see the water from the air. 10#/acre? Less?

    I know, us puddle pirates do everything different :woot:[/rquote]

    If your worried they won't see it from the air, broadcast it in wide strips, it will be heavier where you drive, and thinner out to the edges.
     
  10. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    We drill 6 to 8 pounds for cash crop,,,or should I say used to. I'd think 10 pounds per acre would be a reasonable rate for broadcasting. You may find it easier to spread if your fertilizer isn't clumpy, to just mix it in with the fertilizer and spread both together. Its sometimes easier to spread more material than it is to try and get the smaller amounts on evenly. If your fertilizer is clumpy,,don't try it,,it will be an excercise in frustration.

    :cheers::cheers:
     
  11. Redonthehead

    Redonthehead Active Member

    May 2, 2005
    Springfield
    You are correct that milo is best planted in rows so the ducks can see the water. I have to broadcast too, and thus do it thin - and might even disc in strips early if I get it too thick. Milo is like millet in that it will "tiller" - put up more heads if conditions are good - thus another reason to plant thin. The WGF brand is small seed so I would try 8-10 lbs per acre but even that might be thick.

    I wish my place was dry - still have water on it. Broadcasting jap millet onto mud immediately after the water is gone is ideal. I might try a little milo like that!
     
  12. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    Red, have you ever planted jap millet this early in the year?
     
  13. Redonthehead

    Redonthehead Active Member

    May 2, 2005
    Springfield
    No, I haven't but might try a little. I understand the birds will likely wipe it out. But a fresh mudflat is prime to plant it, and it would sure beat cockleburrs!
     
  14. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Lighter broadcast rate is always better than heavier when it comes to milo. I'd bet 8# would be plenty.
     
  15. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    [rquote=1273530&tid=89067&author=Redonthehead]No, I haven't but might try a little. I understand the birds will likely wipe it out. But a fresh mudflat is prime to plant it, and it would sure beat cockleburrs![/rquote]

    I think this qualifies as ideal conditions for broadcasting jap millet. i thought about doing it but today but it just seems too early. I'd be interested to hear how it turns out if you give it a try Redonthehead. Held off on the milo also. thanks for all the input though, hopefully i'll have some good plot pics for you later this year.

    We put a couple boards down on the drain to raise the water up another inch or two (another field is draining into this one) and then are just going to let it evaporate/soak in until its dry. I'll probably throw some jap millet and milo on the mud flats in another week or two if the weather cooperates as a little test plot.

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  16. buxNdux

    buxNdux New Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    KC
    Has anyone ever planted Jap millet this early in the year? It'd be nice to get the seed down on the mud flats now before other vegetation comes up, but I'm worried about them maturing too early and getting wiped out before the ducks move down. Never have planted this early so I don't know what to expect.

    I may try and go down this weekend and throw some milo in the mud if the weather cooperates.