Missouri Whitetails - Your Missouri Hunting Resource banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,451 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of areas I would like to plant in NWSG. I won't be able to do anything until the spring. What is necessary to get it established?

Do I need to spray, disc and then seed?

I can't get to my farm in the early months (Jan-Mar) so that's not an option.
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
46,682 Posts
Typically don't plant WSG till April or May at the earliest. You're going to need to chemically burn down the existing weeds before planting WSG. Remedy, or Journey is the best chemicals to use in establishing WSG, but if that's not an option, drill with a no till drill made for WSG. Once the grasses start to come up, you'll need to keep competing weeds mowed every few weeks. Mow just above the height of the WSG the first year, & possibly early the second year while it get established. Takes about 3 years for full maturity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,089 Posts
Don't go rushing into anything. A little planning goes a long ways. What is growing in the area right now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,451 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some wild grasses are growing now. Most of it is low growing cool weather grass, I don't know what kind it is. There is some blue stem but it's not very thick. It's pretty sparse.

The Dept of Conservation suggested that I kill the cool weather grass this past fall, but time didn't allow me to get it done. Now I'm trying to think of some alternative for this spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,089 Posts
Don't skip steps or look for shortcuts. You could spray it this spring, but I wouldn't plant anything. Plus you might be surprised what you have in the seed bank if you get rid of the cool season grass. You may not need to plant a darn thing.

Just spray it when the cool season grass is really green this spring. Probably be in April sometime.
 

·
Under appreciated
Joined
·
88,086 Posts
Remedy will not kill any grass species if you use that for a pre-plant burndown program.
Journey will kill annual grasses on burndown but if you have perennial stands of say fescue, journey will not get it done unless you crank the rates (off-label... then you stand a chance of putting too much residual down).
Journey does afford you some residual control when applied as per label recommendations but you should read and follow the directions to the letter.
You can go to 32oz/acre and be safe on bluestem but the label doesnt recommend over 21oz/A for say bouteloua sp. due to the imazapic contained in the formulation (which does offer some post activity as well as pre, a fact that I overlook occasionally).

I for one dont really get the ratio of glyphosate:imazapic in that formulation but it gets play in roadsides and forb establishment.
There isnt enough glyphosate in there do much damage on burndown, hence the annual grasses mostly in their weeds controlled section and the fact that they dont recommend burndown on most weeds over bout 4" (there are exceptions, yes)... better get it on young, actively growing weeds for burndown success.
Realize that applying 32oz of journey(max label allowed for wsg siteprep) only puts down 16ounces or the half-use rate of Roundup.

IMO, if you have tough perennials you are trying to take out in the spring, you would be better able to control both burndown and residual for WSG or forb release by applying plain ol Roundup (glyphosate-you could apply a high rate for tough to control species without over dosing the pre-emergent) and coming back or tank-mixing the proper rate of Plateau (imazapic)... this would be a pretty expensive acre compared to rup alone and I have no idea what Journey costs vs. rup alone.

And then there is just plain old burndown with Roundup and plant away. :D
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,092 Posts
If it were me I would have someone go in and try to ID as many plants as possible. You may find out that the forbs that are currently there are benefitial. Thus spraying them may not be in your best intrest and it will save you some money. If you have Big Bluestem, you may have something else in there such as Indiangrass and you might not want to kill preexisting plants.

If you have fescue I would suggest that you don't plant this year and use this year as a time to spray the fescue and make sure that it is gone before you start with the planting otherwise you will have some trouble ahead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,089 Posts
Absolutely woodchuck! Dealing with a field full of sparse prairie remnants would need a different prescription than a field with nearly all fescue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,518 Posts
I agree with woodchuck,

Spray the fescue and see what pops up first before any other actions are taken. I personally would burn this spring, then spray the fescue after everythinge else goes dormant in the fall to see what you really have.

Then re-spray next spring before the NWSG and forbes really start growing to get rid of the remaining fescue.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top