Missouri Whitetails - Your Missouri Hunting Resource banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that I can usually do pretty well on the practice range, but I tend to fight a little buck fever when in the woods. I tend to want to hurry the shot up. For some reason, I'm afraid the deer will see me and that'll be it, or I'm afraid the deer will leave and I won't get a shot. I know I shouldn't worry about those things and just focus on making a clean shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,647 Posts
Oh man droptine.......I can't help you wiff that one. I suffer from that meself! :rotfl: I tend to wanna rush it and get that sucker on the ground too!

What I was refering to was the nerves that accompany the shot!

But this is a good topic too. I'm gonna have to sit back and watch cause I am the worlds WORST when it comes to patience!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, it could be nerves during any point of the shot process, hunting or not. I notice that drawing the bow does calm my nerves, but I still want to hurry that shot.


Edit: DSG, elaborate on what you suggested. I just felt compelled to start this thread. Take it wherever you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,764 Posts
I don't get too anxious really...of course I'm wanting a shot to present itself, but I usually figure that I've done enough homework that it will unless I spook the deer.
I just grab my bow and wait. While I'm waiting I'm not watching the deer the whole time, I'm trying to anticipate where he is going to walk. Once I figure that out I can look and usually know when I'm going to be able to draw. So that's what I'm thinking about, not looking at rack and getting nervous, or looking at deer if it's a doe.
Once that's figured out I just wait until he gets to the spot where I've decided to draw and I do, then all that's left to do is make the shot. I will usually be aiming where I'm planning on taking the shot, not at the deer. Then when the deer gets there it's all about picking a spot and executing.
Then again, I've had those surprises like everyone where it all happens in a matter of seconds. Those are good for me because then I don't have time to think, just react.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,764 Posts
I worry a little about spooking deer on the draw as well, once the bow is drawn it's a dead deer walking unless I make a stupid mistake. My nerves are gone once the bow is drawn
 

·
PURE KILLER
Joined
·
38,024 Posts
rock solid nerves here,till the shot .then i just faint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,647 Posts
Good point 'yote! I know, it was funny, but it makes an important point! :eek:

It all boils down to what aspect of the process you really have confidence in.

Hoyshooter spelled it out best when he said if he could get drawn down wiffout being busted it was a dead deer.

For a lot of us, we have more confidence in our shooting abilities (maybe a little bit of arrogance) than is good for us and we might tend to push things a little beyond the limits sometimes because of our impatience.

I know I had it happen last turkey season. It was a nice wake up call though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,764 Posts
thh

I'm with you 100% on that feeling!! I have it before I shoot and after I shoot I have to sit down...wobbly legs!
If that ever goes away I'll stop hunting...something I've always said.
Even from the beginning I havn't had nerves as a problem while shooting at a deer...guess i'm lucky that way. Actually shouldn't say I'm not nervous...heart rate is up and I know I'm nervous, but excited more than nervous in a bad way, nothing to make me shake or affect my shot or anything.
Before and after...big time nerves!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,902 Posts
Oh man, I'm a mess when it happens quick. If he's taking his time I have time to collect myself. But when one comes in chasing a doe it gets me rattled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,357 Posts
I do with the bow ,I just hope it passes after time like when I was young and with a rifle,but having deer within 6 feet of makes me shake like a tree in a tornado
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
I get "Buck fever" even when a doe or small buck comes around, and I know I'm not gonna shoot. I guess that what keeps me going back in the woods. After the deer passes, I have to make sure my safety harness is tight ....so I don't fall out the tree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
I can't tell anyone how to control their nerves, but I can give a little help in working around them. I am a firefighter when I am not a Dad or a novice hunter. We get into so extremely fast paced, high stress situations. When we pull up on a house fire, we are indivudally responsible for a assortment of tasks, any one of which can get someone in physical danger or cause lots of damage. This results in tunnel vision which is where you get so focused on one task or aspect of a situation, that you loose sight of all the other things going on or needing to be done.

I like to do a process called task visualization. This is when you take a task (focusing on a deer, and pulling the trigger for example,) and you play out and visualize the various steps to that task in your mind. I usually do it as I am laying down to sleep. By doing this on a repetitive basis, it builds a recorded process in your mind. When you get into a situation that you must preform as certain task, you literally think of the task and metally "hit play" for that task. The result is a fast some what nerve free action on that task. Try it and see what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,647 Posts
novicehunter,

thanks for your response. I think, in fact I saw the word "process" toward the end of your post.

What causes the nervousness is focusing on "results" pre-maturely. By focusing on that shot and most noteable the "aiming process" the nervousness takes an unconcious role in the whole situation.

I guess how I would relate it to a shot on a deer would be that my brain, through my eye was completely connected with that individual hair, not a general area, but the precise hair on the desired point of impact on the deers side. You accomplish that, there will be no nervousness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
I'm almost embarassed to say how I deal with this problem...

I used to get WAY to excited and even missed a few deer. Like the rest of you I have very little patience when it comes to wanting to get a big deer down.

So what do I do? I started bringing Louis Lamore westerns into the stand with me. I read these short stories and get so into em' that I'm often "supprised" by deer when they walk up on me. Believe it or not my success rate has increased big time since starting this practice.

Before when I was hyper alert I'd have to watch deer come in at times from 100+ yards. By the time it got to me I'd be so worked up that I was shaking.

Not anymore--I just read my westerns and enjoy my relaxing time in the woods. When a deer comes up on me I identify the target, take appropriate action, and make a good clean kill.

Works for me....
 

·
Under appreciated
Joined
·
92,110 Posts
Hey DWB... thats a good practice..

Great way to kill time in the stand. We all know that bigguns are killed during
non-typical times of the day, mostly anyway.. Whatever keeps you in the stand all day is a good
idea, IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38,393 Posts
Originally posted by novicehunter
I can't tell anyone how to control their nerves, but I can give a little help in working around them. I am a firefighter when I am not a Dad or a novice hunter. We get into so extremely fast paced, high stress situations. When we pull up on a house fire, we are indivudally responsible for a assortment of tasks, any one of which can get someone in physical danger or cause lots of damage. This results in tunnel vision which is where you get so focused on one task or aspect of a situation, that you loose sight of all the other things going on or needing to be done.

I like to do a process called task visualization. This is when you take a task (focusing on a deer, and pulling the trigger for example,) and you play out and visualize the various steps to that task in your mind. I usually do it as I am laying down to sleep. By doing this on a repetitive basis, it builds a recorded process in your mind. When you get into a situation that you must preform as certain task, you literally think of the task and metally "hit play" for that task. The result is a fast some what nerve free action on that task. Try it and see what you think.
Novice, I do the same "visualization", only I do it while on stand...Imagining what I would do if Mr. Big were to come down that trail, or over that knoll, etc...trying to imagine every possible scenario that a deer might do...then, when the "moment of truth" happens, I've (most of the time) already "been there"!!!
 

·
Jenny's Lackey
Joined
·
47,529 Posts
Terrific topic.

Anxiety for me comes from putting expectations on the task. I had a 15 year old boy teach me the most about how to control my anxiety. Several years ago, I shot constantly. 3D every weekend in the summer, indoor spots tournaments every weekend in the winter. I took on this kid named Matt who had tremendous potential with a bow, & started teaching him to shoot. A lot of good natured ribbing back & forth. He would be shooting lights out till I would walk up behind him & say anything, then he'd throw one completely off the paper. He wanted to outshoot me that bad. One night, he got really mad at me for this & said, "how would you like it if I done that to you?" My respose was go for it. The only rule is you can't touch me, otherwise anything goes. Week after week, this kid would try everything in his power to distract me. I got a little Missouri mule in me, I wasn't going to budge no matter what. No way was he getting the satisfaction of knowing he caused me to miss. What I learned was incredible focus & how to tune out any noise or movement around me. Concentrate on the X. Aim, Aim, Aim...............nothing else matters. I'll never forget the first night he outshot me. I was absolutely thrilled for him. I had a guy that took me under his wing once upon a time, & the first time I outshot him, was a great day for him.


I spend a lot of time reading & napping in the treestand. Yeah, I said napping. Only when I'm in my API climber. Feel safe as a baby in mama's arms. Always got an ear open even when napping or reading.

One other thing I do, I let a lot of deer walk. Some pretty good ones too. It's kinda like what novicehunter was describing. I'm mentally playing it all out while that deer is in bow range. That has done the most for my buck fever of anything on the stand.

Sorry for babbling on so long.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top