Mulberry

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by brushpile, May 24, 2009.

  1. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Every Mulberry on my place is heavily browsed. In fact it seems to be the #1 browse, and I have lots of diversty. Has anyone else observed the same?
     
  2. archer66

    archer66 5 shots 1 kill

    Jun 21, 2008
    I like to browse on the berries when they get ripe.....
     

  3. venatic

    venatic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    The birds like the ones by our house, then they share them.:mad2:
     
  4. nastyjack63

    nastyjack63 Well-Known Member

    Dec 17, 2006
    osage county
    [rquote=1274105&tid=89196&author=archer66]I like to browse on the berries when they get ripe.....[/rquote]So do the deers. I've seen 'em standing on their back legs to get to berries. The fish really like 'em too, if you can find one hanging over water and droppin berries the fish will be there.
     
  5. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Everything likes the berries, but I am seeing heavy browse on the leaves. I'm having a hard time growing Mulberries, because the deer are mowing them down. On one of my older trees, deer have stripped the lower branches. I have also observed that while deer browse certain plants seasonally, they seem to browse Mulberry year round.
     
  6. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    Mulberry, yum yum!!
     
  7. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    I have only noticed them eating the fruit and have several young mulberry trees that do not seem heavily browsed. The deer have been eating the multi-flora rose quite a bit tho...they will have to beat me to them since everyone I find gets a nice hot dose of roundup.
     
  8. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Couldn't tell you...we kill em all. :peepwall:
     
  9. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    Just curious Dano, why ya killin' the mulberry trees?
     
  10. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Things multiply too quickly and get everywhere you don't want them. I think they are a good wildlife tree, just don't like their habits.
     
  11. usfwc

    usfwc New Member

    574
    Feb 24, 2007
    Miami, OK
    I have seen that as well, Brushpile. They'll eat the leaves when they drop in the fall as well. Do you have red or white there?
     
  12. Mastevt

    Mastevt Strutt Buster

    Apr 16, 2009
    Grain Valley
    Brad, I went down to the property yesterday afterwork to chk on things, the tops of almost all those maples that I planted are all browsed off. Seems like the deer like fresh maple too!
     
  13. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Scott, I have observed that deer browse most plants that produce a sweet berry. My Serviceberry is almost browsed to death, and I'm going to have to cage them. Maple probably tastes sweet to deer, and I believe it was fishshooter who said deer eat Maple leaves when they fall from the tree.

    Last year I noticed a young Mulberry growing in my field, and encouraged its growth. However, the deer hammered it over and over. By the end of Winter, it was browsed down to thick branches, and in the Spring the regrowth was quickly browsed. So I planted a few Mulberry seedlings, hoping they would establish well enough to tolerate browsing. Even though they are surrounded by weeds, the deer have found and killed most of them. This leads me to believe that deer can scent Mulberry, and seek them out.

    Mulberry resprouts with profusion, and is a plant that would make a good foodplot border, because it appears to attract deer. If it gets too tall for deer to browse, it can be cut back, and will resprout. In fact, the recut stump will grow a bush that produces lots of forage at browse level.

    I know that birds + Mulberry = MESS. However, if Mulberry is maintained at browse level, its leaves are a draw for deer, and there shoudn't be any berries.

    Brian, I have mostly White Mulberry, but planted Red Mulberry from the MDC Nursery.
     
  14. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    How can you tell the difference between the whites and red as far as the leaves or bark go? I'm assuming they make different colored berries?
     
  15. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    jaytee, on seedlings it's tough. The red's leaves are dull, vs. glossy on the white. I'm not a fan of the white cause it escapes and doesn't make an attractive tree, but browse is browse, I guess.
     
  16. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    Thanks urb. Sounds to me like these would make very good trees or shrubs if you can keep them clipped to plant in a quail covery area as well in and around food plots like Brushy mentioned.
     
  17. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Jaytee, both have the same colored berry. The White Mulberry is grown in China as a host for silk worms. It was brought here, and escaped into our eco system. Red Mulberry is native, and sold by the MDC.

    They aren't easy to ID. I believe Red Mulberry has deeply lobed leaves, that resemble wild grape. White Mulberry leaves are not well lobed... just a lobe on a leaf here and there, and resemble Basswood/Linden. UrbanHunter, can you clarify?
     
  18. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    BP, the leaves on both are consistently inconsistent!
    Glossiness is the best indicator. I'll go look at some red to see if that lobe thing hold true. Mine are larger, though, not seedlings.
     
  19. jaytee

    jaytee New Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Fair Grove
    Hmmmn, clear as mud, thanks guys!:D
     
  20. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    UrbanHunter, some of my Whites have very few lobed leaves on the entire tree.