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Missouri Department of Conservation proposes adjusting permit prices, and wants public input

1931 Views 77 Replies 32 Participants Last post by  Ryfarm48
Missouri Department of Conservation proposes adjusting permit prices, and wants public input

Missouri Department of Conservation Sign


The Missouri Department of Conservation is proposing adjusting prices for most hunting, fishing, trapping, and commercial permits to keep up with rising costs of goods and services it uses to manage its more than 1,000 conservation areas along with nature centers, shooting ranges, fish hatcheries, and other facilities.
MDC received initial approval on the proposed permit price adjustments from the Missouri Conservation Commission at the Commission’s May 19 open meeting at City Hall in Washington, Mo.
Missouri is home to more than 1 million anglers, 500,000 hunters, and several thousand trappers. MDC issues nearly 2.6 million hunting, fishing, and trapping permits each year. Most MDC permit prices have remained the same for the past 20 years while costs for goods and services have increased significantly since then.
“In early 2003, the price of a resident firearms deer permit was $17 and the cost of a gallon of unleaded gas was $1.42,” explained MDC Director Sara Parker Pauley. “Jump ahead two decades to May 2023 when the cost of a resident firearms deer permit is still $17 while the cost of a gallon of gas is about $3.30. That cost increase adds up considering MDC purchased nearly 908,000 gallons of gas in 2022 to run vehicles and equipment.”
Pauley added that, on average, most resident hunting and fishing permit prices would be adjusted by about $1.
“Compared to other states, Missouri permit prices are in the middle-to-lower end of the scale and would still be a bargain,” she said. “The average price of a resident firearm deer permit for surrounding states is $54 compared to Missouri’s proposed price of $18.
Additional revenue from permit sales will help MDC maintain and improve its nationally recognized programs and services for hunters, anglers, wildlife watchers, and others. Conservation efforts supported by revenue from permit sales include:​
  • Maintaining and improving nine fish hatcheries around the state that raise and stock more than 7 million fish annually for public fishing – including about 1.3 million trout at five hatcheries.
  • Maintaining and improving more than 70 public shooting ranges around the state.
  • Ongoing habitat work on nearly 1,000 conservation areas, including 15 intensively managed wetlands for public hunting and wildlife watching.
  • Expansion of popular youth offerings such as the Missouri Archery in the Schools Program, which has reached more than 200,000 young archers at nearly 700 Missouri schools, and the Discover Nature Schools Program, which helps more than 87,000 Missouri students each year at more than 700 schools around the state learn about and connect with Missouri outdoors.
  • Helping more than 24,000 landowners create and maintain habitat for wildlife.
  • Research on the health and sustainability of deer, turkey, quail, waterfowl, songbirds, fish, bears, elk, and other species.
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of harvest regulations for fish and wildlife game species and understanding resource-user preferences.
  • Restoration, monitoring, and protection of imperiled and endangered species and habitats.
  • Removal of invasive species that threaten the health of native species and habitats.
  • Maintaining and improving 15 nature and interpretative centers around the state.
Pauley added that most Missourians are generally familiar with some of the work MDC does, but there are new challenges — with added costs.
“In addition to everything we offer and the work we are known for, we have new and expensive challenges,” she said. “Our staff are dealing with more and new invasive species and wildlife disease outbreaks. And the costs of many things we must buy regularly keep going up, from fuel to fish food.”
Some of the proposed permit price increases are:​
  • The price of a resident hunting and fishing permit would go from $19 to $20.50. The average price for surrounding states is $42.47.
  • The price of a resident fishing permit would go from $12 to $13. The average price for surrounding states is $23.
  • The price of a resident small game hunting permit would go from $10 to $10.50. The average price for surrounding states is $26.57.
  • The price of a resident trapping permit would go from$10 to $11. The average price for surrounding states is $29.38.
  • The price of a resident spring turkey permit would go from $17 to $18. The average price for surrounding states is $47.69
  • The price of a resident firearm deer permit would go from $17 to $18. The average price for surrounding states is $54.06.
  • The price of a resident antlerless deer permit would go from $7 to $7.50. The average price for surrounding states is $24.21.
  • The price of a youth resident antlerless deer permit would go from $7 to $7.50. The average price for surrounding states is $24.21.
  • Those under 16 and over 65 years of age will still get no-cost small-game hunting permits and no-cost fishing permits.
For more information on the proposed permit price adjustments, including a complete list of permits, current and proposed prices, average prices of similar permits for surrounding states, the last year the permit prices were raised, and other information, visit the MDC website at this link.
Permit sales account for about 17 percent of MDC’s annual revenue. Other significant revenue sources for MDC include the Conservation Sales Tax at about 62 percent and federal reimbursements at about 15 percent of total MDC revenue. Sales and rentals, interest, and other sources make up the remaining 6 percent of MDC revenue. MDC receives no funds through fines from tickets or citations, and no funding from the state’s general revenue funds. For more information, read the MDC Annual Review for Fiscal Year 2022 in the January 2023 issue of the Missouri Conservationist online at this link.
MDC will next seek public comments about its proposed permit price adjustments.​
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I'm onboard a dollar or two increase for residents AS WELL AS a significant increase in non-resident tags.
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Just a thought....maybe no more free landowner tags? I'm a landowner but wouldn't object to doing away with it.:cool:
They tried that crap once and got their *** handed to them,just leave the farm tags alone.
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"Helping more than 24,000 landowners create and maintain habitat for wildlife."
Is this a total times that landowners needed help or 24,000 different landowners?

I would think a landowner should have to "maintain" it themselves.
I know in one state that if the state helped you with a pond and stocked it, you had to let those who asked permission to fish, into fish. Maybe Missouri should do the same
"Helping more than 24,000 landowners create and maintain habitat for wildlife."
Is this a total times that landowners needed help or 24,000 different landowners?

I would think a landowner should have to "maintain" it themselves.
I know in one state that if the state helped you with a pond and stocked it, you had to let those who asked permission to fish, into fish. Maybe Missouri should do the same
At one time the public was allowed to fish in those ponds stocked by the MDC but only by permission from the land owner.


Here are the rules for today:

Information on stocking options is available at www.mdc.mo.gov/10194.

Pond owners who accept fish retain full rights to control access to their ponds.

Accepting the free fish doesn't obligate them to allow fishing or other uses on their land by the public.

However, ponds stocked by the Conservation Department are subject to provisions of the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The fish can't be bought or sold, and statewide fishing regulations must be observed. Those restrictions do not apply to pond owners who buy fish from commercial sources.
At one time the public was allowed to fish in those ponds stocked by the MDC but only by permission from the land owner.


Here are the rules for today:

Information on stocking options is available at www.mdc.mo.gov/10194.

Pond owners who accept fish retain full rights to control access to their ponds.

Accepting the free fish doesn't obligate them to allow fishing or other uses on their land by the public.

However, ponds stocked by the Conservation Department are subject to provisions of the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The fish can't be bought or sold, and statewide fishing regulations must be observed. Those restrictions do not apply to pond owners who buy fish from commercial sources.

Theu used to say you didn't have to give permission if MDC stocked it. But they did usually urged the landowner to give people access to the pond if they asked for permission when they stocked it.
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A friend of mine bought some land with a house near Truman a couple years ago. It had a pond that you could not see due to the trees that were growing around and in it. I do not know all the details but he contacted the PLC and they told him good luck. No plans, help cost share or referals. So he spent the money and had all the trees removed, dam rebuilt and pond dredged then paid to have a private fish farm stock it. Got it done just about the time he retired.

With the Deer/turkey/quail/pheasant decline maybe do away with the habitat program completely, aka PLC's and maybe they will all come back.
If their going to compare to surrounding states then our non resident tags need to double.
They are not rocket scientists are they?
Maybe they should stop wasting money on turkey studies!
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Let’s not forget the MDC allows NR to take spots away from residents on managed hunts..
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Has anyone even looked to see if Ia, IL and other surrounding states residents tags are actually more expensive
How bout NO! I’m not buying a license again here, no need to
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How bout NO! I’m not buying a license again here, no need to
🤓🤓🤓
It’s hilarious(not really)that nowhere is mentioned about the 1 eighth of one percent sales tax that they generate on outdoor equipment sales. A small incremental fee increase is understandable. But a reference to how gas has doubled almost makes you think that they have the same mentality that their permits need to do so as well.

The only thing that needs adjusted is the prices of NR tags and permits. MO is a tag sales vacuum because of their low prices and over availability. It’s time MO catches up to surrounding states fees.
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How bout NO! I’m not buying a license again here, no need to
Yep no deer or Turkey in Missouri. Head somewhere else 😉
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Mdc sure making plenty of money on what seems like a vast increase in virtual clear cuts of conservation areas.
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Raise Non-resident tags.
Probablem solved
Every other midwest state is nearly double
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I think it is ⅛% of every taxable sale not just outdoor goods
It’s hilarious(not really)that nowhere is mentioned about the 1 eighth of one percent sales tax that they generate on outdoor equipment sales.
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Has anyone even looked to see if Ia, IL and other surrounding states residents tags are actually more expensive
yes, they are..... MO is very cheap. That said, as many others have pointed out.. MO also has that sales tax dealio in this state, that the others do not.

Honestly, if MDC needs more revenue from tag sales, let the NR's pay for it.... That's what they do to us. Although, I am not a fan of any price increase if it's all up to me. :D
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Maybe they should stop wasting money on turkey studies!
And just liberalize the heck out of raccoon and possum kill'n. :D
And just liberalize the heck out of raccoon and possum kill'n. :D
wouldn't help a thang!
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