Is this tree dead? (pic)

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by brushpile, Jun 4, 2009.

  1. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Some have asked why a tree still grows leaves after it is girdled. This tree was cut and put in my woodpile three months ago..... is it dead? It has put on 8 inches of new growth, even though no part of the log is touching the ground.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    It's magic.:claphands:
     

  3. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    It must be, cuz that was a bare log. But is the log dead?
     
  4. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Yeah, BP. Tree's store energy in the limbs and branches. It still had enough energy to flush, but that's it. Once they lose moisture, they won't be able to replace it.
    A walnut won't send roots out along the trunk or stems, so it's dead. If that were a willow, or a birch, or one of the bottomland species, you could stick it in the ground, and roots might form.
    No roots, no life. No top, no life.
    A lot of trees can have a dead root system, and not appear dead for a year or so.
    Those are called epicormic shoots. Last gasp to live.
     
  5. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    I had a tree that was completely cut down leaf out in the spring. Same phenomenon. Really screws with what you think should happen.
     
  6. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    I posted this pic to show that properly girdled trees are as dead as this log, but take awhile to appear dead, because stored energy will cause leaves to grow............... even on a log in a woodpile.

    The epicormic shoots on this log also occurs on the trunks of crowded trees that need light. It's a sign that TSI is needed to improve the health of the forest.
     
  7. Heart shot

    Heart shot Active Member

    Jul 19, 2008
    St. Louis
    We had a large maple we girdled in late winter (March I think??) Anyway the tree is green and healthy as ever when I looked at it last week. Hope it dies, I wonder if the sap jumbed the girdle and I need to girdle it again, or is the same phenomenom happening to may Maple as what is happening to your log??
     
  8. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    [rquote=1287989&tid=90042&author=Heart shot]We had a large maple we girdled in late winter (March I think??) Anyway the tree is green and healthy as ever when I looked at it last week. Hope it dies, I wonder if the sap jumbed the girdle and I need to girdle it again, or is the same phenomenom happening to may Maple as what is happening to your log?? [/rquote]

    Probably. There are still quite a few maples on our place we are waiting for them to die. I think they are dead and just don't know it. If the leaf out again next spring, then they will get another round.
     
  9. Heart shot

    Heart shot Active Member

    Jul 19, 2008
    St. Louis
    Yeah our forester said that sometimes if you girdle to late in the winter/early spring the sap is flowing so well up the tree that it will jump the girdle and the tree will live. So he said to re-girdle it this winter.
     
  10. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    I have trees I double girdled 2 months ago, and they look sick, but still have leaves. I know mine are dead, cuz I girdled the heck out of them. I made two one inch deep cuts 6-8 inches apart, and removed the bark inbetween. I can get mean with a chainsaw.;)
     
  11. Heart shot

    Heart shot Active Member

    Jul 19, 2008
    St. Louis
    Yeah I am sure that would do it to them. Does the tree looks like a beaver got to it??:D
     
  12. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Well, most of my girdled tree fall down within a year.:rof2: