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I hunt with the wind in my favor.
 

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Let me see if I can find the old posts about this. Nope, they've all been lost in never never land. And I saved my old posts ON MY OLD COMPUTER THAT IS TOAST! :mad:

Parker
 

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Wash your hair with baking soda (making a paste).

Toss baking soda on your camo. (like STEALTH DUSTish)

Wash yourself with Ivory Soap (don't get caught up by the hunting soap hype).

Use Arm and Hammer unscented deodorant.

Wash everything in Arm and Hammer Washing Soda, and put it in tubs in white plastic bags (NOT black ones, they have scent).

Also, you can make a home brew spray with a hunter specialties bottle (after you use it up). Put a couple tablespoons of baking soda in the bottom and then fill the rest of the bottle 3/4 full with water (so you can still shake it up REALLY good). I use this kind of bottle 'cause the ones that you buy in the hair care section at Wally World will gum up.

Parker
 

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Parker,

Not sure on this because I have never tried it, but I thought I seen/read in other homemade recipes I have seen that it's important to use "Distilled" water.:confused: Maybe that just applies to us city dwellers where they put all kind of chemicals in the water? Just wondering as I plan to try some of my "own" spray this fall.

Booner
 

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I agree with Parker's baking soda theme, except I chop up oak leaves, cedar greens, and a couple of acorns in a pot of water and boil them. Turns the water dark, kinda like tea, add baking soda, pour in spray bottle.
I don't get to hunt without wind affecting me, it swirls in my section all the time.
 

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Originally posted by GoGop
I use the green soap that comes in what looks like a shampoo bottle. Head to toe, including my hair. (What's left of it). :rotfl:
Me too!!!!
 

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Originally posted by booner
Parker,

Not sure on this because I have never tried it, but I thought I seen/read in other homemade recipes I have seen that it's important to use "Distilled" water.:confused: Maybe that just applies to us city dwellers where they put all kind of chemicals in the water? Just wondering as I plan to try some of my "own" spray this fall.

Booner
:smileyshrugginghisshoulders:

You asked for cheap. :D I never use distilled, but you can use that if you want. There's no question that the baking soda neutralizes the smell of the water.

I'm all about simple and cheap. I make a new bottle of the stuff about every other morning that I hunt. That's how much I use.

Parker
 

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Here is the text from Field and Stream:

You Stink
Slather on this mix to keep from getting busted
By T. Edward Nickens

Even if you shower in no-scent soap right before your hunt, the little bit you sweat going to your stand will turn into a powerful stench to deer. That’s why smart hunters compulsively use commercial scent killers. The problem is that their cost can make you apply them sparingly, which is like putting deodorant on only one armpit.

Here’s a simple homemade scent killer. Hydrogen peroxide kills the bacteria and fungi that turn sweat into a deer-busting funk, and baking soda deodorizes whatever sneaks by.

What You Need:
3% Hydrogen Peroxide
Distilled Water
Baking Soda
Shampoo

How It's Done
Step 1: Shop
Assemble the ingredients:
2 cups (16 ounces) 3% hydrogen peroxide
2 cups (16 ounces) distilled water
½ cup baking soda
1 ounce unscented shampoo (available at drug or health-food stores)

Step 2: Mix
Gently combine all the ingredients in a large bowl until the baking soda dissolves. Pour this mixture into a 1-gallon lidded container, such as a milk jug. Let it sit for three days with the lid on loosely to allow gases to escape.

Step 3: Bottle
Fill a plastic bottle that has a trigger sprayer with the scent killer. It must be clean, so buy a new one from a hardware store or online (usplastics.com).

Step 4: Wipe
To make scent-killing wipes, place plain brown multifold paper towels—the kind that come in stacks, not on a roll—in a small plastic tub with an airtight lid. Cover them with scent killer and let it soak in. Pour out excess liquid and replace the lid. Now you can wipe down boots, bows, and stands, and even use a towel or two to neutralize the sweat you produce shinnying up that perfect white oak.

Bring Bucks into Range Using Scents
When 50 yards is the farthest shot you can take, using scent lures (and controlling your own stench) becomes extremely important. Without cover scents and attractants this sport would be alot more difficult. And that's saying something. Here are a few basic tips and tricks to help you get started.

Parker
 
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