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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought me a new toy and it has some beautiful wood in the stock, It has some age and a few blems and I am thinking about refinishing the stock. I haven't been able to find out for sure what the current finish is, One guy that looked at it thought maybe it was a Tru-oil finish and that maybe the guy just got tired of working on it and that I could continue on trying to do more layers of Tru-oil the pictures aren't the best as it was the pictures from gunbroker where i bought the rifle. I will get better pictures and add them later!! I was just wondering if I should just try to continue Tru-oiling or Strip, or Sand, and start from scratch!!

[file]44976[/file]
 

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King of Callaway
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I know it's off topic but that looks like a long bolt what Caliber
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is an Inerarms Mark X mauser with a Flaigs barrel in 25.06!! The bluing is immaculate also, I haven't shot it yet and I don't know how much use it will get especially if I refinish the stock!! I am kind of itching to get it out and see what kind of patern it will hold!!

Thanks for asking.
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Beautiful figured wood.:eek::

Nice thing about an oil finish, it's easily touched up cause the next coat of oil reactivates the last coat & they melt together.

What does tru oil recomend for cleanup? Typically, the cleanup chemical is also the solvent for thinning the finish. Some finishes, like laquer or shellac, can be disolved using the solvent for thinning. If that's the case with tru oil,( I don't know) then you can probably take the solvent & reactivate the previous coat & then start applying additional coats.

A couple other chemicals to try to reactivate the finsih are denatured alcohol, used with shellac & laquer thinner, used to reactivate laquer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Originally posted by pinwheel
Beautiful figured wood.:eek::

Nice thing about an oil finish, it's easily touched up cause the next coat of oil reactivates the last coat & they melt together.

What does tru oil recomend for cleanup? Typically, the cleanup chemical is also the solvent for thinning the finish. Some finishes, like laquer or shellac, can be disolved using the solvent for thinning. If that's the case with tru oil,( I don't know) then you can probably take the solvent & reactivate the previous coat & then start applying additional coats.

A couple other chemicals to try to reactivate the finsih are denatured alcohol, used with shellac & laquer thinner, used to reactivate laquer.
Would it be safe to say that if I try to reactivate whatever the current finish is that is on the stock, and the current finish isn't Tru-oil, and it looks crappy or don't mix well, I can always let it redry and go to sanding down, whatever the current finish is and start from scratch?
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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What do you mean by it looks crappy? Doesn't look bad in the pics. Is it just rough, or did the finish not take well, or what? I'm confident we can walk you through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First of all I am assuming the finish is kind of old, one or two spots have for lack of knowing how to describe it a spider web type cracking about the size of a dime in a couple of spots!! Then there is a couple of spots like where whatever the finish is that it was on too heavy and you can see some runs, When you turn the gun upside down, there is a few spots on the underside of the comb where it didn't look lik it was sanded smooth before the finish was added, and then under the receiver you can kind of see where the finish has kind of opened up and you can see where like the finish has pulled into the wood grain so it isn't a smooth finish!! Then you can see one spot on the forearm where the drug the gun across something and blemmed the finish. I hope all of that made sense!! To me the stock has great potential if finished correctly, none of the above items are terrible but this is the nicest wood stock I have ever owned and I think all of the items I mentioned can be fixed and with a little work This stock would be beautiful for a long time!!
 

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i may be wrong but it almost looks like someone sprayed some shellac or some sort of sealer on it and got a little carried away, which would explain the runs and the spiderweb cracks.. if this is the case it will need to be stripped down before any added coats of finish can be applied.
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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The spiderwebbing gives a great clue. Sounds like a repairable finish. Probably a shellac based finish. Get you some denatured alcohol & laquer thinner & some fine steel wool. It's not going to be a real fast repair, but it's repairable. Trial & error are going to be the key to figuring out which solvent is going to work best. If it's as I suspect, the denatured should soften the finish & allow you to blend it back together. As you get the imperfections blended back, after the blending dries, take some 220 paper & some fine steel wool & work on smoothing the finish back out. After you've got everything smooth to suit you, scrub everything good with steel wool to abrade the surface for the new finish to have somewhere to bond. Next, wipe everything down with a lint free rag wet in detaured to remove any dust. Now start applying your new finish. Give as many coats as necessary to acheive the desired finish.
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Originally posted by missouri10x if this is the case it will need to be stripped down before any added coats of finish can be applied.
Not necessarily true. So long as the new finish doesn't negatively react with the existing finish, he should be able to put new finish over the old.

If the stock was finished with poly, then it's going to blister when he applies a laquer based finish. At that point, he'll need to refinish completely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know there are different types of steel wool, and you mention fine steel wool, Can you give me more specifics on that? I've not done much wood working so am kind of ignorant in that department. I also see where you say denatured alcohol and laquer thinner? I am thinking that is 2 different cans of stuff so do I mix them together and if so how many parts of each? or do I try them separately and see which one works the best. Thanks for all of the great advice and when I get the chance I'll give all of this a try and hopefully pictures of the finished product!!
 

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Jenny's Lackey
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Yep, 2 different chemicals. It's gonna be trial & error to see what works best. Denatured is the mildest & should be tried first. Next, give a 50/50 mix & try again. If still not good, try the laquer thinner. In the areas where you've got the runs, take a razor blade, or utility knife blade & scrape away the excess finish. Fine steel wool? 00 through 0000 should give you a good combination. You can also use a scotch brite pad. Same stuff ya use on your slate turkey call.
 

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VECtor Custom Calls
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Originally posted by pinwheel
Same stuff ya use on your slate turkey call.
:eek: Now he's pulling out all the stops and leaving no information unturned!

You can buy a box of pads through Amazon.com that will last you a LOT longer for a good price compared to buying pads in the cleaning section at the store.

Parker
 

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first and foremost if it's a varnish or a shellac, id say get it off there, strip it to the bare wood, get some linseed oil and refinish it... you would not be out anything refinishing it, i try to do 1 or 2 of mine every other year, and the guys at the gun clubs i shoot at keep me busy doing theres also
 
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