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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year my little plot had about a foot of leave little on it and I raked and tried to burn it off.
Would leaving this year leaves on it when I till be a problem ?
 

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I would guess no. If anything I would say it would act like a thin layer of mulch. But I have been wrong before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thats what I was thinking. Last year it was like any other Oak woods, a foot of leaves so I wanted to get them off to work the ground, but with this years leave only I'm thinkin I can just till them in.
 

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Thats what I always do with my food plot. Just work them into the ground. Kind of just like working the corn & bean stocks into the ground. Heck the leaves might actually be good for the soil.
 

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Hardwood leaves will add acid to the soil, be sure to do your soil tests and lime accordingly.
 

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Thayer took the words right out of my mouth. That many leaves can be pretty acidic to the soil. You should be fine tilling them in but liming would also be a good idea.
 

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There is a pretty broad range of pH that most plants will tolerate, usually between 6 (slightly acidic) to 7.5 (slightly alkaline). Dont waste your money on lime if you are between these ranges.

BTW.. I will be happy to pH your soil if you will ship me a sample. I cannot analyze for micronutrients but I will pH it and I would be happy to do this for nada! U2U and I'll give you my info!
 

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Hey rat, what do you use to test the ph...liquid or a meter?
 

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I saw a ph tester in the Cabela's spring turkey catalog. It was a meter. Only $21.99 or something like that. Pretty handy to have. Just add distilled water to your soil and TEST AWAY. They advertised that it was just as acurate as sending it off.
 

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Ph is a good judgement of your soil, but I have found that if you can get a certified NPK analysis of you soil and do your homework with the results, you can save a good chunk of change on fertilizer costs. A PH meter would be good to adjust your lime additions, also a costly adventure.
 

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Originally posted by Thayer
Hey rat, what do you use to test the ph...liquid or a meter?
I use a lab-standard pH meter.. Like jm says, just mix the soil with distilled or di water and insert the probe. Not complicated and the pH meters at cabelas would do the trick just fine, so long as they are calibrated properly. Our meters are calibrated monthly.
 

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If you turn a lot of leaves under, you may have to add a little extra nitrogen to the plot. While the leaves are decomposing the bacteria will tie up most of the nitrogen in the surrounding soil. When decomposition is complete the nitrogen will be available again. The rate of decomposition will depend on the amount of nitrogen available and the amount of moisture in the soil.
 
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