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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you get more speed out of a shorter or longer fletching? perhaps more spin and tighter groups? I have 4" vanes now and wondered if I would gain anything going to a 2 or 3 inch vane?
 

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Anytime you lose weight you gain speed, the same goes for vane length shorten the vane drag is lost. The problem with shortening the vane is it takes a little longer for the arrow to stablize.
 

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Originally posted by Big John
Anytime you lose weight you gain speed, the same goes for vane length shorten the vane drag is lost. The problem with shortening the vane is it takes a little longer for the arrow to stablize.
This is pretty much correct. However, as it was explained to me, the stability issue has more to do with the surface area of the vane. I went from shooting rather short (height) 4" vanes to shooting the 2" blazer vanes which are taller. The surface area is close to the same. Most people find that the blazers work extremely well and stabilize the arrow quickly.
 

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I know I am being picky but Hieght was not mentioned, height gives good air action but the stablility comes from having more length for the air to travel over. turbulance is created from the broad head (mechanical or not) as the arrow travels thru the air, the longer the vane the better it can streighten out the turbulance and stop the vibration thru the arrow. With a shorter vane the stabalization will accure farther along the arrows path thus creating a larger group in shorter distances than with shorter and longer vanes.
 

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You bofe answered correctly. You shoulda stopped there.

Tune your bow right and the stabilization issue is a non-issue. But by all means don't let me stop a good argument! :rotfl:
 

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DSG an arrow is acted upon by to forces, them being the forces of the bow and the forces of nature. Not unlike a bullet when a bullet travels down a barrel it is made to rotate around it's axis however, when it leaves the barrel the center is changed by the gravity of the planet thus causing it's rotation to slightly differ from when in the barrel, this gyration causes the bullet or arrow to vibrate as it travels thru the air. The amount of vibrations the projectile encounters determines it's path to the target, therfore the sooner the vibrations can be stablized the smaller the target group will become.
 

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OK Big John. I believe you, and sure won't argue. While you were typing that I just shot about another 10 practice arrows from 60 yards. It's prolly just me, but that'll do me more good than trying to figure out how to read a slide rule. :D
 

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Originally posted by DShootnstGentemn
OK Big John. I believe you, and sure won't argue. While you were typing that I just shot about another 10 practice arrows from 60 yards. It's prolly just me, but that'll do me more good than trying to figure out how to read a slide rule. :D
:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
 

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I agree with DSG on this one, with a properly tuned bow the details of the fletching wont make much difference other than weight (that being a lighter fletch may gain you one or two FPS and thus a fraction of an inch at 20 yds).

I shoot Easton Excels I had 6 that I bought initially with factory vanes, needed them refletched so I opted for Blazers since I shoot a WB. I bought 6 more that came with the normal 4 inchers, so I had 6 w/blazers and 6 w/factory vanes. I was worried about the difference. I shot the factory vanes just fine, picked up my arrow w/the blazer and shot em, could tell no difference at 20 yds.

Today I was shooting at 30yds. I could not tell the difference at 30 yds between the arrows with the different types of vanes. I would estimate my group size was about softball-ish with 7 arrows, 3 with blazers and 4 with factory vanes.

This was not a real formal shooting session, it was my first time shooting at 30 yds with my new bow and I was shooting into a poorly lit garage from my neighbors backyard (no I didnt ask for permission first);)

My broadheads flew just fine as well. I am pretty pleased. Over the next month or so I will continue to try and fine tune to shrink my groups. But back to your question, I really couldnt see any difference in between the two differing fletchings. FYI the blazers were about 2 grains lighter per fletch.
 

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Feathers stabilize faster than vanes & weigh less. Drawback to feathers is they are noisyer & don't do well in rain.

If your hunting, don't worry about the few fps you'll save by shortening your fletch. The forgiveness you gain from longer helical or offset vane will far outweigh the small loss of speed.
 

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Originally posted by pinwheel
If your hunting, don't worry about the few fps you'll save by shortening your fletch. The forgiveness you gain from longer helical or offset vane will far outweigh the small loss of speed.
I'm confused.

Bohning touts that their blazer vanes were built to better stabilize fixed-blade broadhead flight.

I'm gonna get to work doing some research on this deal.

EDIT: Off of Bohning's website

http://store.bohning.com/products/1672.xml?cat=1602

The Blazerâ„¢ Vane: What it is and Why it works
Bohning's revolutionary new Blazer™ Broadhead Vane has changed the way archers think about arrow guidance, especially with fixed-blade broadheads. Most of us have been led to believe that more is better when it comes to our vanes and feathers making our broadheads fly like our field points. The Blazer™ Vane proves that theory wrong by out performing 4 or 5 inch vanes or feathers…and the Blazer™ is only two inches long.
HOW CAN THAT BE POSSIBLE? Independent testing shows that while some spin is necessary for accurate flight, too much can cause your arrow to lose speed very rapidly. What is required is a guidance system that will take over and steer the arrow regardless of what the broadhead is doing. The Blazerâ„¢, with its unique design begins steering and correcting immediately. The combination of the steep leading edge angle, and material stiffness, enables the air to flow over the vane in a manner that actually creates lift and leaves the tip of each vane inside undisturbed air. This is similar to the drafting principle used in auto racing. This airflow created by the precise leading edge angle allows the tip of each vane to act like a rudder, which is very noticeable at longer distances with the flatter trajectory Blazerâ„¢ vanes provide. Just give the Blazerâ„¢ a try and you will believe! Weighs 5 grains, .6 inches high.

Take it or leave it. I am well aware that this is an advertisement reguardless of the "independent" testing.
 

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I have had excellent results with the shorter blazer vanes. I have now officially shot 2 different types of broadheads using the blazers, with good groups and on target with my field points. I especially like them because I still continue to shoot the TM hunter style rest and the shorter vanes even with a slight helical, leave more room for rest clearance. Another thing I found out this year, is that if torn or pulled loose the shorter vanes don't make near as much noise in flight as the longer thinner vanes. I'm sure that there are pros and cons to both types of vanes. Are they faster??? I think so,,but not by any large margin. Will they stabilize as well???? As far as I can tell yes,,,but then all they need to stabilize is enough anything more than enough is just over kill. (.02)

:cheers::cheers:
 

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Originally posted by jmmcguire
Originally posted by pinwheel
If your hunting, don't worry about the few fps you'll save by shortening your fletch. The forgiveness you gain from longer helical or offset vane will far outweigh the small loss of speed.
I'm confused.

Bohning touts that their blazer vanes were built to better stabilize fixed-blade broadhead flight.

I'm gonna get to work doing some research on this deal.

Take it or leave it. I am well aware that this is an advertisement reguardless of the "independent" testing.
Sorry man, I have no experience with their vanes. It's been over 4 years since I've shot competitive, so all I can offer is experience from a time when I did shoot alot. I hunt with Muzzy 4 blade & 4" vanes & get good results.
 

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I switched to the Blazer vanes 3 years ago and don't see myself switching to anything else soon....

I don't know how much difference they make compared to other vanes but I believe they have helped my downrange accuracy somewhat....Then again like others have said a well tuned bow and some practice will do even more for ya....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am not as concerned about the speed as I am about grouping. The main reason I asked this questions is because I recently changed to the WB and with 4" vanes they rest a little bit inside the WB until you draw. I thought about switching to a shorter vane so only the shaft would rest in the WB. However it does not sound like I would gain any great benefits from re-vaning all my arrows.
 
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