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I've got a pair of back up boots, but good boots none the less. They are supposed to be waterproof but that last few times I have noticed a small leak somewhere. I have looked and looked and cannot find a hole or tear. Water seems to be coming in near the toe. Is there any type of test I can do to try and pinpoint the link? Thought maybe I could put some silicone in it.:shrug:
 

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2 ways to test for leaks. Fill bath tub, put hand in boot and submerge boot. Your ahnd will be better able to detent teh leake faster then your food would simple becuase the hand is more sensative then the foot.


If you think its a small leak. PUt water in the boot and then dust the out side wiht a powder. Where the powder gets wet is your leak spot.
 

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The easiest and fastest way is reverse engineering. Clamp the top of the boot AIR tight! Submerge boot in water, where you see air bubbles, you apply your water proof sealant. Just make sure to use a sealant that dries to a rubber feel, or if on the sole, then a shoe repair cement. After years, and miles of backpacking I KNOW this works on the smallest of leaks. Sealing the top of the shoe can be as simplistic as wrapping a plastic bag with a rubber band. The greater depth you get the shoe you get increased pressure from the air being compressed and eventually finding a way to release the pressure. Remember fixing a bicycle tube as a kid, just like that!
 

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Horny D
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[rquote=1577892&tid=109578&author=SNA2STL]The easiest and fastest way is reverse engineering. Clamp the top of the boot AIR tight! Submerge boot in water, where you see air bubbles, you apply your water proof sealant. Just make sure to use a sealant that dries to a rubber feel, or if on the sole, then a shoe repair cement. After years, and miles of backpacking I KNOW this works on the smallest of leaks. Sealing the top of the shoe can be as simplistic as wrapping a plastic bag with a rubber band. The greater depth you get the shoe you get increased pressure from the air being compressed and eventually finding a way to release the pressure. Remember fixing a bicycle tube as a kid, just like that![/rquote]

Hmm, a set of quik-clamps, a 5-gal. bucket full of water, an air compressor with a blow-off wand...:thinking::2thumbsup:
 
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