Father/Son trip of a lifetime..... Talk Turkey with me!

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunting General' started by Alaskageek, Jan 25, 2018.

  1. fullfan

    fullfan Active Member

    614
    Feb 23, 2016
    I wish I was 13 and from Alaska! Thumbs up Sully!
     
    20' likes this.
  2. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    Howdy fellow Gobbler Busters!!

    Just have to give another big shout out to da man, Sully!!! We talked for quite awhile on Friday and looks like things are set for my son and I with Sully very generously planning on taking us out on his land to show us the ropes and begin our journey into the great sport of MO Turkey huntin!!!!

    Although Sully is da man, I would really very much like to thank all those who answered my call for help/information. All of it will go into my memory vault as I learn more and more.

    Got my son out to the range this weekend (along with his step brothers) and had fun, despite the 30mph winds and chilling cold. All did very well, and they all were consistently able to put all 10 shots from their 10/22's in a 9" paper plate at 50 yards, with iron/open sights, as well as gained some great experience loading mags and working their rifles with gloves on.

    Was able to put in several hours of practice on my box and mouth calls. Tried to do it in the basement while watching the outdoor channel, but even though my girlfriend is amazing, she quickly banished me to the garage to practice. Feeling pretty confident with what I think are good clucks, yelps, and purrs on the box call, but will have to sound off to some experienced ears to be sure. I'm able to get noise out of the mouth call pretty consistently now , mostly clucks, but still working on being able to get the reed from my hand, into my mouth, and then be able to make a decent cluck with my first try. Having more problems with the yelp, seems like the pitch is too high at the start, and the last few notes seem shorter than then they should be, also not as low pitch as the last few notes I get off the box call when yelping. Have tried a few purr's with the mouth call, but lips, tongue and mouth don't seem to want to cooperate with that one, as when I am finally able to get a purr like sound, it's very loud. Aren't purr's usually pretty quite? The other question I have about mouth calls is.... how long do they last? Seems like the 'reed' part on my is stretching out even just over the weekend of practice. Is that normal?
     

  3. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    I havent read back through this thread, and you mention the 10/22s but you will be hunting MO with a shotgun correct? :D
    Good luck.. sully is a good man, you will enjoy this no doubt.
     
    20' likes this.
  4. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    From an earlier post: "My oldest son, Ranger, is turning 13 and his mother is finally allowing me to fully expose him to firearms and hunting. I've been able to work a few things in over the years starting with firearm saftey and working up to being able to give him his very own Ruger 10/22 and getting him out to the range a few times."

    Thanks for the heads up Rat, but yes, we are planning on using shotguns for the MO Turkey hunting. No problem for me, but my son has limited experience with firearms at all, so am going to have to work over the next few months to get him into a shotgun. Right now I'm focusing more on first and foremost safety, then good "mounting" to his shoulder as well as proper sight picture, and lastly getting him comfortable 'running' the weapon. Sully has a 20ga in MO that he has offered for my son to use, since all I have are 12ga. I hoping to find a family member or friend here in CO that has a 20ga that I could borrow for a couple of range session come probably March, so I can introduce my son to recoil. If worst comes to worst, might end up trying to find some very low recoil 12ga rounds that he can run through my upland over/under, which is heavier than my Remington 870 thats set up for home defense.
     
  5. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    Mouth calls aren't the easiest to master. The more complex mouth calls (more reeds etc.) are harder to master (takes more air). Single and double reed are easier for a beginner. Feeding purrs are soft low volume. Fighting purrs are made the same just louder and faster. Each type sounds they make mean different things and get different responses. Keep practicing and watching calling videos, youtube, etc.
     
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  6. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    With your boy being 13 I'm sure he'll be able to handle the recoil. Let him start with some light game loads making sure he's mounting the gun correctly and work your way up to turkey loads.
     
    Alaskageek likes this.
  7. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    You can bet the farm that I will keep at it! Also planning on picking up a slate call this week to start working with it. Then the last one will most likely be a owl locator call.... unless the experts here say a crow is better. ???
     
  8. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    Use light target loads when you are getting him used to shooting/patterning the gun. Slip a 3"mag shell in there for hunting (sully will know what shells pattern the best with his setup) and he will never know the difference when he shoots. If you have a bird working into the decoys and he shoots, thats all he will be thinking about and the recoil wont matter with a flopping bird out there.
    Good luck!
     
    Alaskageek likes this.
  9. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    Yeah, figured when we get to shotguns, I'd start him out with some 2 1/2" trap or #8 loads, reduced recoil if I can find them. Then on the next session, start the same but then throw in some 3" turkey loads. I've talked with and let him know that on the range, you will feel and hear it, but in the field, with your prey in your sights, you will never feel or hear the the shotgun go off.
     
  10. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    I've got an owl call that I never use. I just use my mouth. One less thing to carry. You might just try making the owl call before you buy one. Same thing with the crow sounds. I can make the sounds with my voice and one less thing to carry.
     
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  11. Wings Fan 19

    Wings Fan 19 Well-Known Member

    Dec 4, 2008
    Kansas City, MO.
    One thing to bear in mind is turkeys have excellent hearing so call softly. Of course windy/rainy days and distance from the birds factor into volume.... But overall quieter is better. On a calm day you will be surprised at how well they can hear over long distances.
    I've all but given up on calling to birds when they are still roosted and prefer to get on the calls as soon as I hear them fly down.
    On more thing about mouth calls is the ability to use them with no movement, if you're not in a blind that hides movement it's nice to have that option.
     
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  12. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    Thanks for the info. Sounds like volume should change depending on how weather and terrian will effect the sound waves as well as how "far" out you want the call to be heard. Softer the better, especially if you are already working a gobbler thats responding. I do like the idea of no movement, as well as the hands free that a mouth call gives you. Ideally, I'd like to become proficient on all three, prior to April
     
  13. Bootheel Boy

    Bootheel Boy Well-Known Member

    Sep 4, 2012
    SEMO
    Just saw this thread. Awesome offer Sully. Very generous. Hope to see photos of some big dead old toms sporting ropes for beards.
     
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  14. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    When I have birds out of sight I will use all of my calls (mouth, box, slate) giving the impression of multiple hens. Once I have one close I only use my mouth call and maybe rake leaves. Closer they get I do more purring, soft yelps, and more raking leaves. Once visible I usually don't call.
     
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  15. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    All of this turkey talk is getting me anxious for season. :elmer:
     
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  16. Wings Fan 19

    Wings Fan 19 Well-Known Member

    Dec 4, 2008
    Kansas City, MO.
    I didn't read the whole thread, but another tidbit I left off is sometimes being quiet is more important than calling. If you are 100% confident a bird responded to you and is close... Shutting up and making him come looking for that "hen" kills a lot of birds.
    I've guilty of wanting to get him to gobble one more time before I crack his skull.
     
    WBF likes this.
  17. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    If you have a gobbler responding, and you are confident that he is, resist making him gobble. Set the call down, no matter how much it hurts and make him come looking for you. This is one of the most valuable learnings I have gotten from folks on here and its worked for me. A couple of years ago, I had a bird holding up and gobbling, not moving. I knew where he was and he was a long ways away, so I started ripping yelps on the box call, a 7 or so yelp cadence about every 10-15 minutes. About 10 minutes after the third cadence he let loose with a gobble only about 60ys away, didnt make a peep during the time he made his way to me. Abandon the call, get ready.. make him come looking for the decoys.
    And for sure as huntnfool says, when you see them, spend your time getting ready, not calling.
     
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  18. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    Wings beat me to it while I was typing all that. :D

    I will say another time I had a bird only about 100yds behind me in the timber, cut me off 2 times with gobbles as I was yelping so I just set the call down. It took a bit over 30 minutes but he came in silent and I gonged him right before he got to my decoys.
    30 minutes of silence on his part and no calls on yours once you had a bird gobbling is a leap of faith but it can work if you know he is responding to you.
     
    20' likes this.
  19. Alaskageek

    Alaskageek Member

    35
    Jan 25, 2018
    Very generous indeed!! So overjoyed to be allowed this opportunity for both my son and I. Will be posting pic's here no matter what the outcome!!
     
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  20. huntnfool

    huntnfool Active Member

    958
    Oct 10, 2011
    Central Mo
    I've also had birds that were hung up on something and refused to move. Maybe a ditch, fence, or creek they didn't want to cross. One particular bird I worked for a long time. Once I realized he had a barrier I started cutting and lots of excited yelps almost non stop (most of the time it would have been too much). I called excitedly for some time then shut up and put the calls down. 20 minutes later I gave a soft yelp and he gobbled almost in gun range. Sometimes getting them excited like that and then just shutting up will force their next move. Each bird is different. Having multiple tricks up your sleeve will put more birds in your truck. Key part is knowing how they are responding to you. Some birds want lots of calling some hardly any.