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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took some plugs from local seed collected last year to fill in where some ditches are starting to form. Stagger planted these to slow the flow of water coming off the hill as some ditches are cutting pretty bad from this years rains. I'll be back up in a couple weeks to collect more remnant seeds from the county to save genotypes. The few scattered plants are starting to disappear in the few places I've found them still. Cattle kill it out since they're not rotational grazed on a lot of farms back there.

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That stuff is tough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Put in seeds from 20 collections made from northern MO yesterday. There's 6 spots per collection between each PVC (each pvc has the name/location on it). This is part of the seeds anyways, I'm saving some back for some herbicide tests on a different plot.

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I need to get some goodies in the mail for ya.
 
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Does the gamma produce an endophyte like fescue during the hot summer months? Would it stand up to rotational grazing? Can you plant in a mixture with orchard grass, fescue, clovers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Does the gamma produce an endophyte like fescue during the hot summer months? Would it stand up to rotational grazing? Can you plant in a mixture with orchard grass, fescue, clovers?
Never heard of it having an endophyte like fescue from all the literature I've read. It has to be rotational grazed to maintain the stand. It seems to do better as a pure stand as opposed to mixed cool season grasses, but never hurts to try it in a mixed stand if you have the time/sources to get it!!

I'm growing mine with large trailing wild bean to see how they work together. I'd imagine that would be quite the forage mix for cattle while being wildlife friendly.
 

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Never heard of it having an endophyte like fescue from all the literature I've read. It has to be rotational grazed to maintain the stand. It seems to do better as a pure stand as opposed to mixed cool season grasses, but never hurts to try it in a mixed stand if you have the time/sources to get it!!

I'm growing mine with large trailing wild bean to see how they work together. I'd imagine that would be quite the forage mix for cattle while being wildlife friendly.
Appreciate you sharing the info and the time your putting into this project. Putting a legume in the mix is an excellent idea. We've been establishing new ground for pasture as well as rejuvenating existing pastures for cattle. I'm always trying to thread the needle when it comes to establishing forage for cattle and wildlife thus a lot of clovers, birdsfoot trefoil, lespedeza, iron clay peas... looking forward to your results ..
 

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Appreciate you sharing the info and the time your putting into this project. Putting a legume in the mix is an excellent idea. We've been establishing new ground for pasture as well as rejuvenating existing pastures for cattle. I'm always trying to thread the needle when it comes to establishing forage for cattle and wildlife thus a lot of clovers, birdsfoot trefoil, lespedeza, iron clay peas... looking forward to your results ..
gamagrass is very sought after for cattle and rotational grazing is a must because they will graze it out if enough residual height and rest aren't given. I would not plant any native warm season grass with cool season grasses. Two reasons, NWSG doesn't compete well with csg and also when csg are at an optimal time to graze, NWSG is just starting to grow and grazing those NWSG tender seedling will reduce tillering and stand thinning or loss will occur. Don't over look big blue and Indian grass as a NWSG forage as well.
 
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I would also agree that Gama needs to be managed. We call it the ice-cream of the field. If it is in a mix cattle search it out and graze it. We have successfully mixed both warm season and cool season grasses as long as they are both native species. mixing fescue and most warm season is not real effective. Mixing wild rye's and other cool season grasses along with native warm season grasses and forbs is a successful grazing mix that is wildlife friendly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would also agree that Gama needs to be managed. We call it the ice-cream of the field. If it is in a mix cattle search it out and graze it. We have successfully mixed both warm season and cool season grasses as long as they are both native species. mixing fescue and most warm season is not real effective. Mixing wild rye's and other cool season grasses along with native warm season grasses and forbs is a successful grazing mix that is wildlife friendly.
One farm I received permission to collect from had horses on it. I talked to the guy about Gamagrass and showed him what it looked like. He had an ah-ha moment at that point...."I wondered what that was the horses would run to first when let out in the field!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Going to be fun planting all these test plugs later this summer!! I'm going with the shotgun approach: multiple sites for the collections. This should hedge any bets of a total loss. I'm planting the collections on nodaway silt creek bottom, gara loam upland, and Adair loam upland.

I'm thinking for future seed collection it may be best to take a hay cutting off it first, so the seed stalks come on at the same time for a more uniform seed harvest.

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I would also agree that Gama needs to be managed. We call it the ice-cream of the field. If it is in a mix cattle search it out and graze it. We have successfully mixed both warm season and cool season grasses as long as they are both native species. mixing fescue and most warm season is not real effective. Mixing wild rye's and other cool season grasses along with native warm season grasses and forbs is a successful grazing mix that is wildlife friendly.
I should have mentioned I was speaking about csg that are typically planted in Missouri pastures (fescue/orchard grass). Native csg are not nearly as aggressive than non native varieties so they would work together but I have to ask why you would plant them together in a grazing situation. Their growth curves, nutritional values, and palability peak at different times. For increased utilization and increased animal performance, separate fields would be easier to manage to optimize the benefits of the different species. Sorry for derailing the original post. Feel free to private message me if you like. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The variance in leaf size is noticeable between these two varieties of gama. The one with the wider leaf does get a bit more shade, but also gets over 8 hours of sun.

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