do you recomend using tree shelters? Is it worth the money and time?

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by citybowhunter, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    After going to the trouble of planting seedlings i'm wondering if it's worth the money to use tree shelters. It appears that if anything new shows up the deer have to give it a try and I'm getting my pin oak seedlings and hybrid poplar cuttings browsed. If they are worth the money what is a good brand of tree shelter and where do you get them so that you don't over pay for them?
     
  2. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    bump.

    sure could use some peoples thoughts on this so i don't waste my money if they aren't worth it.
     

  3. 20 feet high

    20 feet high CROSSBOW HATER!

    Feb 19, 2009
    I surely have no insight on this matter sorry man.
     
  4. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    [rquote=1284585&tid=89843&author=20 feet high]I surely have no insight on this matter sorry man. [/rquote]

    it's the thought that counts. (humor)

    it sure is disappointing going over to see my hard work and seeing the tops and leaves nipped off.
     
  5. 20 feet high

    20 feet high CROSSBOW HATER!

    Feb 19, 2009
    [rquote=1284594&tid=89843&author=citybowhunter][rquote=1284585&tid=89843&author=20 feet high]I surely have no insight on this matter sorry man. [/rquote]

    it's the thought that counts. (humor)

    it sure is disappointing going over to see my hard work and seeing the tops and leaves nipped off.[/rquote]

    i bet, we planted like 100 small pines and my guess is they were like appetizers for the deer.....never planting them again unless someone answers your thread and I learn how to protect them:D
     
  6. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Keep this bumped for letemgrow. We planted a crapton of trees and shrubs and didn't protect a one. Just wasnt cost effective.
     
  7. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    [rquote=1284614&tid=89843&author=HabitatMD]Keep this bumped for letemgrow. We planted a crapton of trees and shrubs and didn't protect a one. Just wasnt cost effective.[/rquote]

    will do.

    it looks like 2.50 a piece plus a stake which cost extra. i guess i could possibly use them after a year or two on the next set of seedlings that i plant. it is really bothering me to see them browsed and stunted. maybe the trees will get past it and it won't be as much of an issue as they get bigger.
     
  8. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    I have a friend that works at a nursery who told me they finally found a product that keeps deer away. I'll email him and get some info.
     
  9. pinwheel

    pinwheel Jenny's Lackey

    Jun 17, 2006
    middle of nowhere
    How many trees are we talkin? Like habitat, I've planted somewhere around 2000 trees in the last 3 years & have not protected anything except the white pines & I just used chicken wire cages to keep the deer off. Worked great, till the stakes rotted & the cages blew off. Now I have zero white pines. Deer ate & rubbed every one in one season.

    When we started planting, most were in a conservation program cp-22. 10'x10' grid. Acceptable survival rate was 50%. I'd say we're slightly better than that, but not much after 3 years.
     
  10. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    I've used tubes, and can talk pros and cons. Here's a link, and you will need tubes that are above browse level, or deer will browse what grows out the top of the tubes.

    http://www.growtube.com/prices/
     
  11. ryanlowe02

    ryanlowe02 Sexual Intellectual

    Aug 11, 2007
    Raymore, MO
    letemgrow used some kind of tubes, and i think he would swear by them........i think you would defintily need something to keep the critters from eating them when they start to grow
     
  12. TOBRYAN

    TOBRYAN Well-Known Member

    Dec 4, 2002
    Liberty, Mo
    I used cages and steel posts on everyone, you cant shoot enough deer to protect them

    [file]59512[/file]
     
  13. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    I prefer the tree pro double wide tubes, just make sure you keep the grass and weeds killed around the tubes in a 4 foot circle. This keeps rodents from wanting to make a nice little home in the tube and also girdling the stem of the seedling. They do not like that bare ground and will stay away from your trees that way. If you do go with tubes make sure you have them well vented so they harden off for the winter. I take a cordless drill and drill small holes in the tube in several locations.

    The bigger diamater the tube the better for growth and overall health...trust me. :D

    Check some tubes out at:

    www.treepro.com

    http://www.growtube.com/products/

    http://www.plantra.com/
     
  14. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    Here is a pic of a hazlenut in the doublewide tubes by tree pro.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    Cherrybark Oak with double wide tube

    [​IMG]
     
  16. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    I had crabapples grow 5 feet inside a tube in one year. Tubes greatly accelerate growth, but they also promote disease. I had to remove tubes from trees to save them from fungal disease. Ventilated tubes and wide tubes provide better air circulation, which reduces the risk of disease.

    Also, when a tree grows out the top of the tube, wind causes branches to abraid and break, where they rub against the top of the tube. Tubes also grow huge weeds, so tubes need to be removed periodically to clear away weeds.

    Be very careful when peeking into a tree tube, chances are good there will be a wasp nest in it. By mid Summer, I have wasps in 30-50 percent of my tubes.
     
  17. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    I think a lot of the "bad rap" that tubes get is because most are not large enough. The tree grows to spindly and cannot support themselves since they are racing to the sunlight so to speak. I would recommend someone only using wide tree tubes or shorter/skinny tubes that are no more than 2 feet tall so the tree can grow out and adjust properly and will not break in the wind.

    The problem with shorter tubes is deer will still browse the growth once the trees emerge. Basically we have 2 choices like mother nature, plant so many they cannot browse them all or place a few and take extra good care of them....I like to do both :D
     
  18. UrbanHunter

    UrbanHunter Well-Known Member

    Here's the email on the repellent.

    The name of the system that is working so far for me is “Sweeney’s All Season Weatherproof Deer Repellentâ€, and I found it at Westlake. One package covers about 18’ to 36’ and doesn’t do anything for other critters, unfortunately.
     
  19. letemgrow

    letemgrow Well-Known Member

    [rquote=1285267&tid=89843&author=UrbanHunter]Here's the email on the repellent.

    The name of the system that is working so far for me is “Sweeney’s All Season Weatherproof Deer Repellentâ€, and I found it at Westlake. One package covers about 18’ to 36’ and doesn’t do anything for other critters, unfortunately.

    [/rquote]

    that system would help though, the tubes could be cut down to about 1 foot each and placed at the bases to keep the rodents away while allowing the tree to grow naturally. I may have to try some with my American Chestnuts. :cheers:
     
  20. brushpile

    brushpile New Member

    Feb 23, 2008
    Springfield, MO
    Letemgrow, I like the long skinny tubes for some types of trees, the extra wide for others, and there are some plants that do better in cages. It depends on the type tree, and where it's planted. For example, bushes like Elderberry, should not be tubed. I will never tube another apple tree either, because the croth angles become perfectly... bad!

    When my trees come out the top of their tubes, I cut the tube in half, so the tubes still protect against rodents. I now that exposes the tree to browsing, but the wind damage if I don't cut the tube, is a sure thing.

    One other problem with tubes... birds think they are toilets.:D As a result, I have found some interesting things growing out of my tubes, like Mulberry, Hackberry, and various other plants deposited by our feathered friends. Mean while the tree I tubed is getting shaded out. Lesson learned... you can't tube and forget.

    That's some nice growth on the pic of that oak.