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I don't think anyone disagrees having quality habitat and a habitat improvement plan isn't good, all I am saying (and I have presented a paper written by a wildlife biologist in Alabama, right next door to Mississippi that agrees) is that predator trapping is a useful, cost effective tool to use to help ground nesting birds, in addition to habitat. It does not have to be either one or the other.

That's it, nothing more and nothing less.
That was an opinion piece, not a scientific paper.
 

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I have nothing against trapping. If someone enjoys it, go for it. But, with the amount of native habitat loss taking place at such a rapid pace nationwide, we should not expect game bird species to rebound to previous levels.
Add to that some huge misconceptions and stubbornness of landowners and managers about what turkey habitat is and isnt, and a flat refusal of many to change anything about their habitat and management, and you have these issues.
 

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The turkey population is also declining in areas where habitat loss has not happened so that can not be the only reason for their population decline. Thanks for recognizing trapping can help a management plan.
Weather will always play a role. To believe that turkey populations will always stay the same or increase in even excellent habitat is naive.
 

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Not saying this isnt a factor but the great plains stretch 180 millions acres. 53 million acres lost is just over about 30% but the lost of bird populations are much more substantial than that. Maybe there is other major factors besides loss of habitat?
But what is being lost? Is it disproportionately bird production habitat? Is this the only loss? Has there also been degradation? Conversion? Succession? Is brooding ground 80% of that 30%?
 

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How do so many urban areas have wild flocks of attacking turkeys in the city? They have some great habitat? Food? Good brooding areas? Just wondering what's the difference between a town turkey and a city Turkey.
Considering predator density is highest in the cities I would rule out less predators as a reason.

I would suspect that in many areas there is good brood habitat near the cities due to constant disturbance.
 

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So it's not necessarily the loss of habitat? I'm sure most towns have less habitat than the country. We all have to agree that habitat is vitally important to any species. But also predators helps control those species populations or at least that's what I was taught in school. There are a lot of keystone species that are predators. Take them out and the habitat and herds get out of whack. Not saying that predators are our biggest problem as they aren't. Its many variables that come into play. Weather, habitat, predators, etc.
Its WHICH habitat is being lost thats most important.

If turkeys are thriving in urban areas it pretty much negates the predator argument. You can look at any data on the subject and see that cities have the highest densities of almost all animals that would prey on turkey nests.
 

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hawk is so s


Please go back to being banned.

Everyone needs to use all the tools available for good wildlife management practices to give your ground nesting birds a better chance of nest and poult success. Trapping has been recommended by a wildlife biologist as one of those tools that helps.
*once your habitat is in the best shape it can be.
 
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