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i have four different stand alone plots and was fully ready to rotate these crops next spring but was wondering if i fertilize lime ect if i really have to? i like how things are set up now< i know theres a chance of disease or whatever but hoping i can leave well enough alone, what do you think?
 

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I have beans in one area that has been in beans for almost ten years, I try to rotate but it seems to never work out like I want it too, this is a very fertile creek bottom,
you can take a soil test and as long as the ph and fertilizer test comes back ok there is really no need to rotate.
I like rotating ground I have had in clover back into a crop like beans or corn, clover puts lots of goodies back in the ground.
 

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One of the main problems with continous cropping systems is the lack of rotational chemistries and the potential for selection of tolerant or even resistant weed biotypes.

In your case, you shouldnt have to worry about such things. Bean on bean on bean if you like and sleep well.
 

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another good thing to do like RMR says is put in a perennial crop for a few years. this allows the soil to rest and let the natural soil structure develop, constant tilling of soil destroys the structure, meaning it will dry faster, drain faster and disrupt the natural way water and nutrients move downward through the soil.legumes do put goodies back in, meaning nitrogen.....resting will also let organic matter build up....which is a good thing.........right Rat???....:wave:
 

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[rquote=1502931&tid=104867&author=Mr_Hannibal]another good thing to do like RMR says is put in a perennial crop for a few years. this allows the soil to rest and let the natural soil structure develop, constant tilling of soil destroys the structure, meaning it will dry faster, drain faster and disrupt the natural way water and nutrients move downward through the soil.legumes do put goodies back in, meaning nitrogen.....resting will also let organic matter build up....which is a good thing.........right Rat???....:wave:[/rquote]
Cant argue with any of that for sure... you know yer dirt. :claphands:
You'll get a nitrogen credit after a legume crop like clovers, alfalfa, beans etc. Varies with crop but you'll not need to apply a full rate of N to an N-consuming crop like corn after a bean crop. Thats one of the reasons a corn/soybean rotation works so well in our area.
 

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Started crop rotation last year with Ladino clover and I like the results so far. I am rotating in/out of brassicas, turnips, wheat and oats.

[Edited on 12/9/2009 by Mecheng]
 

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I have four 1/4 to 1/2 ac. plots. Two are in WW and the other two have been in clover for the last 2 yrs. This Feb. I will frost seed clover on the WW plots and will roll the two older clover plots into warm season plots. This rotation has given me pretty good results with very little fertilizer expense over the past few years. This also gives me something for the deer to eat year round.
 
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