Corn question???????

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by Marine95, May 31, 2009.

  1. Marine95

    Marine95 New Member

    Feb 21, 2006
    Fenton
    I got my corn on the ground on Mothers Day. At the time I fertilized with 12-12-12. I went out there today and the corn varies between 8"-12" tall. I fertilized it today with 46-0-0. My question is should I fertilize again down the road or do you think I am good to go?

    This is my first ever corn plot and to say the least, I am very pleased so far.

    :D
     
  2. marshallgrn

    marshallgrn New Member

    Apr 20, 2008
    in hiding
    you can fertlize again but its best to do right before a rain then cultivate if you can, or the urea would lose its effectivness and could even burn your corn
     

  3. marshallgrn

    marshallgrn New Member

    Apr 20, 2008
    in hiding
    qdma.com has alot of answers from guys for about any question you could have
     
  4. jmbuckhunter

    jmbuckhunter New Member

    Be careful not to let the fertilizer get trapped in the leaves of the corn. If it does it will burn it and severly stunt the growth or kill it.

    Don't ask me how I know this.:stickfight:
     
  5. showmethejewels

    showmethejewels Active Member

    Jan 21, 2009
    Washington D.C
    im not a farmer by no standards but the nitrogen you put on your corn this year will not really be a factor for your corn til next year or two...It takes the stuff like a year to go an inch in the ground if your broadcasting it.....thats why they put the nitrogen on beofre they disc it in the spring...just saying. I would save your money an plant turnips on july 29th. turnips are so rich in Nitrogen you shouldnt have to worry about putting any on your corn unless youre trying for 250 bushel an acre....
     
  6. Kickers288

    Kickers288 Active Member

    thought turnips love the nitrogen:thinking:
     
  7. Grumpy

    Grumpy New Member

    Jul 5, 2004
    Central MO
    I'm not a farmer either but I don't think it takes nitrogen a year or two to work.
     
  8. Kickers288

    Kickers288 Active Member

    [rquote=1287634&tid=89669&author=Grumpy]I'm not a farmer either but I don't think it takes nitrogen a year or two to work. [/rquote]

    im with ya..........if that was the case they would put nitrogen down when beans are in...........pretty sure they arent out there dumping a ton of money waitin on year or two later, when they normally do corn beans rotation
     
  9. showmethejewels

    showmethejewels Active Member

    Jan 21, 2009
    Washington D.C
    I stand corrected like I said Im not a farmer....I do think he is better off if he saves his money on the N and apply it in the early spring....I think its soybeans that produce a sufficient amount of N cuz of the whole legume thing....right?
     
  10. Kickers288

    Kickers288 Active Member

    yeah beans put N back in the ground.............you will get benefits of N if you put it now or later, look what it does to your grass when you throw it out there
     
  11. showmethejewels

    showmethejewels Active Member

    Jan 21, 2009
    Washington D.C
    im with ya..........if that was the case they would put nitrogen down when beans are in...........pretty sure they arent out there dumping a ton of money waitin on year or two later, when they normally do corn beans rotation[/rquote] most people arent putting the N on in the summer either are they....whens the last time youve seen the tanks out in June? No it doesnt take N a year to work if its cultivated/disced in in the early spring before the corn is in the ground.....Yes it does take a year or two broadcasting it In Im 100% sure on that....the roots grow down to find nutrient not up to find them..
     
  12. Kickers288

    Kickers288 Active Member

    so when you spread fertilizer on your lawn how does the N get in so fast?
     
  13. showmethejewels

    showmethejewels Active Member

    Jan 21, 2009
    Washington D.C
    grass has a sprawling root system that pulls the minerals down creating a mat that doesnt allow the loss of nutrients....corn is engineered to dig deep to perservere the long hot dry summer months...you still with me? if the roots are staying on top eating at the N thats all fine and dandy on wet years-which then you run into problems of root rot and other diseases.. but anyways when the roots stay on top it leaves them succeptable when it turns of hot and dry the corn twist and you lose your crop.....
     
  14. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    One time application if you ask me. And showme, I think you are incorrect. Urea is very water soluble, hence its the compound we excrete by whizzing. It should leach into the soil quickly if you can get a rain to dissolve it. The problem is that is sublimes and you could lose a good portion of it. Yet another reason to throw it out before it rains to go along with the "burn" that can occur like henry mentioned.
     
  15. JrNation88

    JrNation88 Active Member

    Jan 2, 2009
    BOCO
    after reading all of this, it all makes sense! the nitrogen sprayer was broke on the planter i borrowed from the MDC so i went back and used a hand sprayer later. Now some of my corn is yellow. Does that mean the nitrogen burnt it and its ruined? dangit if so!
     
  16. showmethejewels

    showmethejewels Active Member

    Jan 21, 2009
    Washington D.C
    [rquote=1289778&tid=89669&author=stlstudent]after reading all of this, it all makes sense! the nitrogen sprayer was broke on the planter i borrowed from the MDC so i went back and used a hand sprayer later. Now some of my corn is yellow. Does that mean the nitrogen burnt it and its ruined? dangit if so![/rquote]

    according to everybody else on the topic no....nitrogen can be applied whenever....Its king of hard to sense the sarcasm on the internet :stirpot: One question though how tall is the corn and was it ever dark green...when corn first comes up it does have a slight yellow color to it...if not the corn is burning up and will not produce much. something else if the ground has too much moisture the corn could be drowning..corn can be very finicky
     
  17. JrNation88

    JrNation88 Active Member

    Jan 2, 2009
    BOCO
    yeah the corn came up light green, about 2-3 inches and now is pretty yellow and dead looking. not all of it but especially the places that were closer to the spray nitrogen. I hate to think i might have wasted money on the nitro and time on the corn just to ruin it......time will tell i guess. I dont think i could handle my entire profit (big time farmers) coming from like this
     
  18. Thayer

    Thayer New Member

    Dec 17, 2005
    Imperial, Mo
    If you looks at a corn plants root system...they are not deep diggers.

    Alfalfa, turnips, and chicory have a substantial root...

    Nitrogen is very mobile in the soil and will be used...but you have to look at what you are really trying to do. Is it worth the money to fertilize?

    Good luck Marine and let us know how it turns out.
     
  19. marshallgrn

    marshallgrn New Member

    Apr 20, 2008
    in hiding
    [rquote=1287696&tid=89669&author=HabitatMD]One time application if you ask me. And showme, I think you are incorrect. Urea is very water soluble, hence its the compound we excrete by whizzing. It should leach into the soil quickly if you can get a rain to dissolve it. The problem is that is sublimes and you could lose a good portion of it. Yet another reason to throw it out before it rains to go along with the "burn" that can occur like MARSHALL mentioned.[/rquote]

    I said that, not Henry he just stole my avatar awhile back :rof2:
     
  20. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD Active Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Durn you guys! Not the first time, won't be that last. :stickfight: