Congressman demands transparency during Squaw Creek name change

Discussion in 'Missouri Outdoor News' started by Stan The Man, Dec 23, 2016.

  1. Stan The Man

    Stan The Man Member

    494
    Mar 4, 2008
    There is confusion about the name of an area national wildlife refuge. Is it Squaw Creek, Eagle Flats or maybe Loess Mounds National Wildlife Refuge?
    It seems Daniel Ashe, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, started the problem by arbitrarily announcing he was changing the name of Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. He even chose an interim name — Eagle Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Although no one at the refuge has changed the Squaw Creek name.

    “This entire process has been rushed through the back rooms of government offices, and FWS has intentionally kept people in the dark because they knew how those affected most would react,†said Sam Graves, 6th District Congressman.

    The director has the authority to change the name without input, said Lindsey Landowski, the refuge manager for the last 1.5 years.

    The name Squaw Creek comes from a creek running through part of the refuge. Landowski, the refuge manager, said no one’s proposing to change the name of the creek.

    “We’re trying to do the right thing here,†Landowski said. “I understand the name has a lot of local significance and people take pride in the name,†she said.

    Sabrina Chandler, the refuge supervisor located in Winona, Minnesota, invited a few chosen people to an “invitation only†meeting Monday at the headquarters building at Squaw Creek.

    The name change and Monday’s meeting have raised concerns for Greg Book, the Forest City mayor.

    “We feel that they are keeping it quiet ...,†Book said.

    Landowski told News-Press Now the Fish and Wildlife Service didn’t want television coverage.

    For those who were invited and did attend Monday’s secret meeting, Landowski, said there was agreement on changing the name to the more “appropriate†Loess Mounds National Wildlife Refuge.

    The name was chosen because of the geological importance of the Loess hills, which are the deepest in the world, Landowski said.

    Local Native American tribal representatives have been and are offended by the name “Squaw,†Landowski said.

    There was a St. Joseph invitee.

    Sara Wilson, director of the St. Joseph Museums, was invited although she has yet to get the letter Chandler sent.

    The museums have been partnering with Squaw Creek for many years and want to know what is going on at the refuge, Wilson said.

    A lot of people weren’t able to attend the special meeting, so they had a conference call, Wilson said. And that was on even shorter notice, so the museums couldn’t participate, she said.

    Back in 1997, the possibility of a name change was discussed. The majority of folks involved in that discussion voted down any name change, Landowski said. This time the result will be different, she said.

    According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the name change will be official in the second week in January.

    “Fish and Wildlife needs to immediately back off the push and start over with a transparent process that considers the will of the people of Holt County and thearea surrounding Squaw Creek,†Graves said.
     
  2. archer66

    archer66 5 shots 1 kill

    Jun 21, 2008
    I like Sam Graves as my Representative and I did vote for him. I'm guessing some residents in the region of the refuge must have contacted him and asked for his involvement?? Not sure what will be accomplished if the article is correct in that USFW can arbitrarily change the name. Not sure I actually care either. Lol.
     

  3. Dafish

    Dafish Senior Member

    Nov 24, 2010
    St. Peters
    So, I can buy all of their Squaw Creek T-shirts n coffee cups today and sell them later for more money?

    The Loess (/ˈloʊ.əs/, /ˈlʌs/, or /ˈlɛs/) Hills are generally located between 1 and 15 miles (2 and 24 km) east of the Missouri River channel. The Loess Hills rise 200 feet (60 m) above the flat plains forming a narrow band running north-south 200 miles (320 km) along the Missouri River.[1] These hills are the first rise in land beyond the flood plain, forming something of a "front range" for Iowa, and parts of Missouri and Nebraska adjacent to the Missouri River.
    During the last Ice Age, glaciers advanced into the middle of North America, grinding underlying rock into dust-like "glacial flour." As temperatures warmed, the glaciers retreated and vast amounts of meltwater and sediment flooded the Missouri River Valley. The sediment was deposited on the flood plain, creating huge mud flats. When meltwaters receded, these mud flats were exposed. As they dried, the fine-grained silt was picked up by strong prevailing westerly winds. Huge dust clouds were moved and redeposited over broad areas. The heavier, coarser silt was deposited close to the Missouri River flood plain, forming vast dune fields. The dune fields were eventually stabilized by grass. Due to the erosive nature of loess soil and its ability to stand in vertical columns when dry, the stabilized dunes were eroded into the corrugated, sharply dissected bluffs we see today.
    The dominant features of this landscape are "peak and saddle" topography, "razor ridges" (narrow ridges, often less than 10 feet (3 m) wide, which fall off at near ninety-degree angles on either side for 60 feet (18 m) or more), and "cat-step" terraces (caused by the constant slumping and vertical shearing of the loess soil). The soil has a characteristic yellow hue and is generally broken down into several units based on the period of deposition (Loveland, Pisgah, Peoria). Loess is known locally as "sugar clay" because it can be extremely hard when dry, but when wet, loses all cohesion. The Loess Hills of Iowa are remarkable for the depth of the drift layer, often more than 90 feet (27 m) deep. The only comparable deposits of loess to such an extent are located in Shaanxi, China.[1]
     
  4. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    I agree area businesses should be included in the process. Many have invested in advertising ect that utilizes the squaw creek name.

    I also agree with Archer that I don't think I care.
     
  5. manitou1

    manitou1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    Truman Lake
  6. vonfatman

    vonfatman Member

    Dec 31, 2006
    A huge cost too...millions to re-fit for new logo. Everything from stationary to the stickers on vehicles.

    Bob
     
  7. venatic

    venatic ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    Thanks for the weather update. :wave:
     
  8. manitou1

    manitou1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    Truman Lake
    I suppose if we get rid of all suggestions of any native american terms then we could successfully erase what small part of their history is left after the Europeans did everything in their power to eradicate the race! Then we can all forget they ever existed. This is all in sarcasm, of course. I would think they would be proud to have refuges, sports teams, etc named after native american terms as a reminder of the true original Americans.
     
  9. archer66

    archer66 5 shots 1 kill

    Jun 21, 2008

    I agree but they clearly don't see it that way.
     
  10. Dafish

    Dafish Senior Member

    Nov 24, 2010
    St. Peters
    I heard that the area manager who has only been there a year and a half, is the one behind it. The local Indian groups had not said a thing an did not know anything about changing the name, in fact they are proud of the name.
     
  11. MeatHunter

    MeatHunter Just Livin' The Dream!!!

    Dec 7, 2011
    This is a move by the "PC Police" while Obummer is still POTUS........nothing more.......
     
  12. Stan The Man

    Stan The Man Member

    494
    Mar 4, 2008
    You are not the only one thinking that way.
     
  13. Hawk

    Hawk Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Oct 15, 2009
    I don't really care what a special interest group inside a group of native Americans thinks... sorry...:wave:

    I wonder if the USFWS director is a political appointee?? If so they may want to hurry and get it done in the next 27 days...
     
  14. archer66

    archer66 5 shots 1 kill

    Jun 21, 2008

    See my first post on the topic. Not getting an argument from me. Lol. :wave::wave:
     
  15. DougC

    DougC Well-Known Member

    Dec 1, 2008
    Independence
    That's what we're being told, anyways...
     
  16. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    Squaw creek was named after the creek that supplies its water. I wonder who named the creek?? Was it European settlers or the Indians themselves?
     
  17. manitou1

    manitou1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    Truman Lake
    My wife grew up by Crazy Woman Canyon, WY.
    I know where it got it's name! Lol
     
  18. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and


    I didn't know either of my ex wives were from Wyoming. Till now.
     
  19. manitou1

    manitou1 Well-Known Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    Truman Lake
    Yup, they manufacture them there!
    Honestly, I couldn't ask for a better partner in life... but it makes for a good joke. :)
     
  20. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    There are a lot of different kinds of crazy. Some of them are not bad. :D