Calling Sounds and pitch

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunting General' started by WhiteTailer, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. WhiteTailer

    WhiteTailer Active Member

    Apr 20, 2005
    Centralia
    Hey, i need to hear from the experts.. when calling Turkeys that you cant see, i have been calling loud... but if you know they are moving towards you do you get softer? or when they see your Decoy do you get softer? or make a different sound?

    all i have is a "Raspy ol Hen" mouth call and a Cherry bomb box call. can i make the right kinds of sounds with that?

    i guess id like to break it down to this.

    type of sound and loudness of it.

    1) Finding them
    2) they are moving towards you but you still cant see them.
    3) you can see them
    4) you can see them but they have stalled out of range.
    5) if they are not talking at all how can you make them talk?

    lots of questions that i can get answers from books and videos but they are all different. what works in the field. give me a guide............please
     
  2. Rebel2

    Rebel2 Well-Known Member

    Dec 16, 2003
    Ozark, MO
    yes what you have will suffice, you can definately very the pitch, volume etc with what you have to sound like multiple birds.


    heres how i do er....

    1. to locate.. i always start out REAL soft clucks just incase theres one 50 yards from you out of sight and silent.. after a couple minutes of that and no responce.. i slowly start getting louder and louder, high pitched and super excited.

    2. once located, if i am moving to close the distance i stop all together, move in to where i want to sit (definately helps to know the lay of the land) and then start calling soft and slow.. if hes hanging up i start calling softer and turn my head away to try to make him think the hens a leavin..

    3. if i can see him, generall im in the thick woods, so that means hes fairly close.. if i can see him, i shut up completely other thena few content purrs real soft.

    4. a few soft purrs and queit cuts and then a lost call or two.

    5. if they wont talk at all, you cant really make em.. some days they just wont talk at all... have gotten many birds when they came in with them not gobblin at all...
     

  3. Poor Valley

    Poor Valley Active Member

    Mar 14, 2003
    Rolla, Mo
    I'm a long way from an expert caller but have spent a lot of time in the woods calling and just watching. The following are just my views on the turkeys.

    I don't see much use in calling at the upper lomits of your call. Chances are he will be distracted by hens if he has a long trot to you. You might move to him some to shorten the distance he has to travel if possible even if he is moving to you.

    If you can see him I believe you should shut up and give him a chance to tip his hand. H will do one of 3 things-come on, run, or stand still.

    If he hangs up the game is all but over. Do whatever you think is smart. I would probable wait for him to leave if an obstruction caused the problem and set up the next day within shooting distance of the obstical next day and try him again.

    Not talking DON"T mean he isn't there. Act like a hen and sit still.
     
  4. Hatch

    Hatch New Member

    Jul 17, 2005
    OFallon MO
    I always start out low in the morning with a soft tree call, once the bird hits the ground I call louder, unless he is coming and with in say 75 yds. If he is out and walking back and forth which is the norm and not closing any distance I will get aggressive but will always save something in the trick bag to seal the deal, I Never give a bird all I have, I like to save the show stopper to bring him in. I believe the sound of your call is less important than the cadence, the tone is different in every turkey but the rythem is somwhat the same. I call to loud and to often most of the time im sure but after you take the gobblers temperture that will help you determine how you should call to him. if he walks the other way gobbling, switch positions and calls and just call soft until he fires up and if he continues in your direction let him find you! if you call to much he has you pin pointed and will hang up alot of times, As a rule start soft and go louder, a bird with in 75 yards needs only a feeding yelp and some soft clucks with an ocassional cut and yelp, 100 yards you can be more agressive if he double and tripple gobbles go with less until he decides what he wants to do. I like to close with just a cluck and scratching the leaves, especially in the timber where he cant stand 100 yards out and look for you, that is deadly! I guess I have rambled on way to long but my best advise would be to call just enough to keep his attention and dont be afraid to try something new, but always hold back your show stopper call until you need it. Mine is a hard series of putts a cackle and a series of broken yelps hopefully followed by a big BOOM! Sorry, I could ramble on all darn day!:D
     
  5. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    A book could be written on this subject. Well as a mtter of fact quite a few have. Every Tom in the woods responds differently to calling. As was said before you have to kinda take their temp and get a feel for the turkey you are calling. Some Toms will come a runnin', others will walk in and others will duck and bob and weave while looking your way and deciding very slowly if they are going to commit. Some may circle you and others may walk off. Young two year old birds aren't too bright and may gobble most of the morning. Older wiser birds have a tendency to pretty much shut up once they hit the ground. Is this because they are always with hens? No. These birds are smart and know gobbling gives up their locations to predators and us. I for the most part will keep my calling fairly soft after fly down if no birds that I know of are working my way. I've had many a Tom come in withot a sound and caught me off guard. If I have had no action for some time I will often hit a box call loud just to let the boys know I am in the vicinity. About 3-4 yelps is all though. If you hunt in the timber raking leaves is a good closer but remember turkeys even scratch leaves in cadence. Scratch, scratch, scratch and then they feed and scratch again. A little soft putting and purring along with this. Using leaves alone I have had turkeys come into gunshot range. Turkeys have a keen sense that allows them to zero in on sounds so you have to be careful about calling once they are in eyesight of you. One more thing. Even if you don't score by 10 o'clock stay out there til 1. Heck it's only three more hours anyways. You never know what those crazy birds are gonna do so Don't Give Up til the law says ya have to. If nothing works come back the next day and the next day until it all comes together. The best way to become a good turkey hunter is by being in the woods as often as possible. Best Of Luck!!:cheers:

    Jack
     
  6. hunter7x

    hunter7x New Member

    Oct 22, 2002
    Indiana
    I love these types of question the "pros" type of post !

    I'm like a sponge.......
     
  7. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    Steve still the best way to learn turkey hunting is by being out in the woods. Even after 40 years of this turkeys clean my clock every year. I think Tom Turkeys must have a Hunter Awareness training class each year before turkey season begins.:D

    Jack
     
  8. Hatch

    Hatch New Member

    Jul 17, 2005
    OFallon MO
    Jack Jr. said it. dont quit until you have to, In my experience if a turkey gobbles later in the morning it is bad news for him and more times than not there is one less gobbler in the woods that evening!!! :behead:
     
  9. hunter7x

    hunter7x New Member

    Oct 22, 2002
    Indiana

    Well before I met this crew the class had a big ole' picture of me up front so they all knew what I looked like and how to best avoid me !
     
  10. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    :hysterical:...:hysterical:...:hysterical:...:hysterical:...:hysterical:

    Jack
     
  11. KChunter

    KChunter Senior Member

    I'd definetly advise purchasing a good quality aluminum or crystal friction call. I've called in birds with box, mouth, and various types of friction calls. Without a doubt, the friction calls have acheived the best results.
     
  12. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    Forgot one thing that has worked quite a few times over the years. If you hunt with a buddy and a Tom hangs up and either you or your buddy can sneak off calling as you go this will on occasion drag the bird in for the other guy. Sometimes these Toms just can't stand gettin' the cold shoulder.;)

    Jack
     
  13. WhiteTailer

    WhiteTailer Active Member

    Apr 20, 2005
    Centralia
    OK, then here is another question. i can Yelp, but i dont understand the Purr and putting.

    any way for you all to communicate that here? wav file?
     
  14. Vector

    Vector VECtor Custom Calls

    Feb 11, 2003
    N/C MO
    Purrs and Clucks: How to

    Is this the type of thing that you're looking for on the purrs and clucks? Hope this helps someone. These are the motions that I have found that work best. These ARE other ways to make the sounds on a friciton call.

    Parker

    How to use a VECtor Sl8te Call:

    Imagine the end of your striker, as it is perpendicular to the Sl8te top, as a clock. Ex: the right side of the working surface end of the striker is 3 o’clock. Different pressure along with different types and woods of strikers will produce different tones.

    Always position the striker in your hand like it is a pencil. Try holding the striker at different levels in the pencil-hold.

    Yelps: Use the 2 o’clock part of the striker in a counter-clockwise short and fat oval shape, never lifting the striker from the slate. You may vary this by having the oval be long ways from northeast to southwest, if the slate surface is a compass.

    Purrs: Use the 10 o’clock part of the striker and pull it slowly down the length of your forearm towards the right side of your wrist and your elbow. Use minimal pressure to do this. When you reach the end of your purr, go back up to the top of the area to start over WITHOUT raising the striker off of the slate. No sound should be made when returning the striker to the step 1 position.

    Clucks: Use the same principle and steps as with the purrs, but use more (sometimes a lot more) pressure on the striker. One cluck per downward motion.
     
  15. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    As turkeys move through the woods they are constantly communicating with the other turks around them. This is done with purrs, whistles, putts and soft clucks. These are ways they tell each other everything is okay and safe. You can learn how to do all of these on a friction call. If you have listened to those turkey sounds you posted sit down and just hit the call in different motions with the striker and see what you come up with. You can also get different sounds by how far up the shaft you hold the striker. Different sounds by using different strikers also. Main thing is to practice, practice, practice. Remember though what was said before about cadence. Keep the cadence steady when yelping and mistakes won't make a difference. Don't stop on a bad note either. Not every turkey sounds the same and they make lousy sounds every once in awhile themselves. Putting and purring doesn't have much cadence as a group of turkeys will be doing some of each pretty constantly. And if you should hear what sounds like somebody spitting and a deep vibrating noise (drumming) that means a Tom is real, real close and you better be ready.;)

    Jack
     
  16. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

    Oct 5, 2005
    Saint Charles, MO
    Great Thread!!! Learned alot....
     
  17. JackJr

    JackJr New Member

    Nov 30, 2002
    Land Of BLAHS
    Nicholas these types of threads are not only good for the novice turkey hunter but the experienced as well. We have lots of folks that turkey hunt and some hunt the deep woods of the Ozarks and some hunt the wide open country of the Northland. Hunting these two areas call for entirely different tactics and this is the place to get the answers. There isn't a one of us that started out a good turkey hunter. Maybe a good woodsman or woodswoman but not a good turkey hunter. I have had some folks tell me turkey hunting was easy cause they went out and killed one their first day hunting. Then they come back in 4-5 years and wonder why they haven't killed another. I never figure a turkey is in the bag until he is down on the ground. Get out there as often as you can and learn all you can about these great birds. It'll soon be a way of life that you can't live without.

    Jack
     
  18. Hatch

    Hatch New Member

    Jul 17, 2005
    OFallon MO
    I just got back in and saw Jack Jr. say that he never figures a Tky is in the bag until he is on the ground! that is The TRUTH! we should have a thread of the "Almost had em! But... I could fill up a page myself...:D
     
  19. WhiteTailer

    WhiteTailer Active Member

    Apr 20, 2005
    Centralia
    thank you all for the advice. this has been very helpfull.

    Mostly at this point, i have taken away a few points. because i already made the mistakes in the field. like Yelping softly at first until your sure theres not a tom close. Dont stop yelping or calling...just be sure its consistant. Get a Slate call from Parker and PRACTICE!!

    I WILL RE-READ MORE.