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May I ask the reasoning in choosing Aspen trees?
After aspen are established, as a rule 3 years, by nature of they way their roots spread then the tops can be cut or hinge cut and the spreading root system will send up shoots to replace the missing 'parent' plant (my wording). In doing so aspen groves can product up to 1,000 lbs of stem browse per acre...wintertime feed, also bedding area feed if hinge cut. The increased stem count provides a place for fawns to avoid predators and increase herd size. Increase the stem count enough and predators become a minor issue for more than just deer species. Deer feed 5x a day so the time they spend on clover, brassicas, corn, beans is only a portion of the time they spend feeding. Provide a cover/feed opportunity then the local herd is more content and less likely to be displaced.
Missouri is on the southern perimeter of the Aspen's range boundary limited by soils and heat as I understand. I've always enjoyed looking at and being among aspen trees and when I saw some seedling offered on eBay for almost nothing I got some. After I got these planted I got on line hoping to get some more but the listing was sold out. I found some more at the Idaho State Pitkin Nursery along with Red Osier Dogwood, another stem species that is easy to propagate so I put in an order for some more.
 

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No offense but they are not native for a reason. Glad callery pears don't cause such good fawning cover....:banghead:
 
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