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My father in law gave me an old k98 Mauser. He doesn't know much about it but says he thinks it is unsafe to shoot.

Everything looks good to me, but what do I know.

Was wondering if anyone here would be able to give me some advice or maybe be able to look at it.
 

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I know jackjr is pretty well versed on ww2 military rifles. If we keep this close to the top maybe he will pop on and have some info for you. I would think a 98 would have to have been seriously tramatized somewhere to be unsafe to shoot. I think it is still considered one of the most durable actions ever built. (.02)

:cheers::cheers:
 

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You might try and send glennasher1 a message also.

I know there are different variations/makes of the 98 Mauser, but they are the action of choice for many who are doing a custom build.

Do you have any markings or pics? Even caliber?
 

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Before shooting it, take it to a gunsmith and have the headspace checked. Sometimes, NOT always, Mausers have numbers on the bolt, receiver and barrel, if they match, it's PROBABLY safe to shoot. If they DO NOT MATCH, it's especially important to have the headspace checked. It might be perfectly fine, but if the headspace is "off", it's probably unsafe to shoot.
After WWII, the rifles were dumped into piles, rifles over here, bolts over there, etc. When they were brought over here, it may, or may NOT, have the original bolt put with it, which can possibly cause headspace problems.

This goes with any older military rifle, and any older rifles in general. It doesn't cost much, if the smith has the correct gages, and can be done while you wait.

Without more info on the individual rifle, it's hard as heck to give any more information, and with Mausers being made in the millions over the last 110 years, there's not much more help I can offer, without more information. There were LOTS of contractors making them, for several countries, in several countries, and possibly with different specs.
 

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[rquote=1499454&tid=104615&author=Doemaster]the guns perfectly fine. theres no expiration date on a gun.[/rquote]

Please have some knowledge before trying to answer something, you could get someone hurt by answering like that. I'm cutting you some slack because you're young, but that was a particularly dumb comment.
 

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[rquote=1499485&tid=104615&author=glennasher1]
After WWII, the rifles were dumped into piles, rifles over here, bolts over there, etc. When they were brought over here, it may, or may NOT, have the original bolt put with it, which can possibly cause headspace problems. [/rquote]

He specifies a K98 Mauser, aren't the K98's German made Mausers? Of which most of them in circulation are Russian claimed from WWII...the rifles were thrown in a pile and good parts used to repair damaged rifles. The Mauser action was pretty consistent and I think it's pretty common to have mis matched serials on the bolts. Always a good thing to have it checked by a gun smith if unsure, definitely check all the old screws and make sure the trigger assembly is still mounted tight. Here's my sporter, have killed several deer with this one in the last 25 years.

[file]82696[/file]
 

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The 98 Mausers were made by practically all of Europe by war's end, the Poles, Czechs, Yugoslavians, Belgians, Spanish, Germans, all were making K98s by the end of the war (yes, I know the Czechs called them 33/40s:) ) but they were all the same basic rifle. China also made them in the millions, and probably Turkey made some of their own, too.

Just need more info on the one mentioned above, and I'd still want it checked by a smith before I put my cheek on the stock.



These days, even new commercial rifles(coughcoughremingtoncough) can be bought with poor headspace, so with an old military rifle, I'd really, REALLY want it checked out before I pulled the trigger on it.
 

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[rquote=1499513&tid=104615&author=glennasher1] so with an old military rifle, I'd really, REALLY want it checked out before I pulled the trigger on it.[/rquote]

Where is your sense of adventure:claphands: I may have started out deer huntin with one of these guns. I had a 98 8mm that was my first (owned by me) deer rifle. I carried a straightend out clothes hanger on my belt that I used to knock the brass out of the barrel when they would stick,,,just tap it up and down like a ramrod on a round ball. I killed me some deer with it,, but about every 4th round or so would stick, so I always carried the clothes hanger.:hysterical:

:cheers::cheers:
 

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The 98 action was so superior to anything the US had that they stole it for the basis of the 1903 Springfield and were ultimately sued by Mauser. There isn't anything inherently wrong with those rifles but the gunsmith checkover is excellent advice. Many European military arms manufacturers (not just Germany) have a penchant for numbering just about EVERY part on their military rifles and bolts do get switched. The tolerances on military chambers are looser than their civilian counterparts to allow for certain ammunition anomalies so switching bolts generally isn't a problem but better safe than sorry! If everything checks out you should be very happy with the rifle and there's no reason it won't give another 100 years of service!
 

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since most of the ammo shot through those old rifles were corosive type, it is not uncommon to have a realy badly pitted bore. just another reason to have a gunsmith look it over as stated above. especialy a smith that owns a bore scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
[rquote=1499434&tid=104615&author=Heeler75]You might try and send glennasher1 a message also.

I know there are different variations/makes of the 98 Mauser, but they are the action of choice for many who are doing a custom build.

Do you have any markings or pics? Even caliber?

[/rquote]

It is a German 8mm.

All numbers are matching.

All Eagles & Swastikas are highly visible.
 

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Nice gun,there are tons of military gun forums out there.Research you mauser and all the markings and numbers......you'll be surprised at all the info on them.......while waiting for the gunsmith to put a go-nogo thru it.
Doemaster i couldnt agree more with glenasher1......get a grip.....old military guns arent to be taken lightly!:toilet:

[Edited on 12-5-2009 by shawncat]
 

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I cleaned up an 03 springfield for a guy at work a few years back.
The locking lugs on the bolt were so worn from use that I refused to shoot it.
When is say worn, I mean BADLY worn, 1/16 of an inch or so. :eek:

I told the guy to take it to a gunsmith and have the headspace checked, he ignored me
and is still shooting it.
you can't fix stupid with words, but a face full of high pressure super hot gas will.
 

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Matching numbers and intact Waffenampts are rare. Most of the rifles in the current market were Russian captures that had the mix n match numbers and obliterated Nazi markings. Sounds like a vet bring back and probably more valuable as a collector instead of a shooter unless it's been sporterized.

[rquote=1499787&tid=104615&author=BowMadness][rquote=1499434&tid=104615&author=Heeler75]You might try and send glennasher1 a message also.

I know there are different variations/makes of the 98 Mauser, but they are the action of choice for many who are doing a custom build.

Do you have any markings or pics? Even caliber?

[/rquote]

It is a German 8mm.

All numbers are matching.

All Eagles & Swastikas are highly visible.[/rquote]
 

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Since gunsmiths will often check headspace as a courtesy, without charge, it's worth the time to take it in for a checkup. It beats the alternative that igor's friend is chancing.

Lug setback can, and does, happen to all brands of rifles, without exception. Older rifles with poorer steel are more often the victims. A simple headspace check can find out, and if necessary, corrective measures can be taken (machine a tad off the back of the barrel and re-install, if the barrel's in good enough shape).
 

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I have a dozen German Mausers and I have ben lucky in that all of them have good headspace. Also I've been lucky that whoever had these rifles in WWII took good care of them. Most have good bores and little pitting. But like every once else here I also say get the headspace checked for safety sakes. There is a fairly good amount of factory ammo available for this caliber anymore. The U.S manufacturers underload this round because of lawsuit fears using old military weapons. If the gun is judged okay by a gunsmith get some European loads and try them. The 8mm Mauser round will knock the stuffing out of a whitetail.
 

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The best rounds I have been able to find are the Sellier and Bellot 196 grain...available at Cabela's (currently out of stock) These rounds will give the 8mm better ballistics than a modern 30.06 IIRC.
 

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blu bogart
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I killed a big doe with my 8mm, Rem cor lock 170 grn sp this year.I think Jack's right I have some old turk rounds[corrosive] that shoot 3" higher than the cor locks at the same distance[75-100 yrds.]They gotta be loaded hotter.
 

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shawncat, the Remington 170s have a muzzle velocity of 2360. Nosler has a 180gr load that does 2600 out of the muzzle. Quite a difference in speed and power. 600lbs of energy difference at the muzzle. The Sellier and Bellot round is even more powerful.
 
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