Anyone else working on the bushy tails?

Discussion in 'Small Game' started by dhaverstick, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. dhaverstick

    dhaverstick High-tech Hillbilly

    969
    Jan 12, 2012
    Fair Grove, MO
    It was raining at daylight both Saturday and Sunday at my house but after the showers quit I got out to see if I could add some meat to the stew pot. It was hard for me to keep my powder dry with all the water dripping off the trees and a few squirrels got a pass when my flinter didn't ignite the way it should have. I did manage to kill three, though. Hunting them is tough this time of year. The little S.O.B.s never stay still and the cover is so thick that I just get lucky when one stops in an open area long enough for me to get a bead on him. Another thing is that it seems all I ever kill in the early season is old boars. It's still fun, though, and I surely do love to watch that cloud of blue smoke wafting through the air!

    Darren

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  2. Mailman

    Mailman Well-Known Member

    Feb 2, 2005
    Blue Springs Mo
    Good shoot'n!

    If you keep showing that smoke pole I may have to get me one.:wave:
     

  3. MOGC

    MOGC Well-Known Member

    Apr 13, 2008
    SE Ozark's
    Not my time of year to squirrel hunt but I sure do enjoy your pictures.
     
  4. Hooks

    Hooks Well-Known Member

    Aug 20, 2010
    Down the bayou
    Im gonna get back into squirrel hunting some time soon. Also, going to have to convince my wife to eat them. Might just have to trick her and get her to admit she actually likes it.
    I just hate cleaning the things.
    I also plan on getting into blackpowder scatter gunning.
     
  5. MOGC

    MOGC Well-Known Member

    Apr 13, 2008
    SE Ozark's
    Squirrels aren't hard to clean. How are you going about it?
     
  6. Hooks

    Hooks Well-Known Member

    Aug 20, 2010
    Down the bayou
    I'm sure there are better ways than what I do, but it seems I always get them covered in hair. A buddy of mine makes a skinning tool that would solve that problem I believe. One of the reasons I want to give it a try again.
    Method I used is to cut under the tail, put my boot on it and pull up. Not really all that hard, but like I said, I can't keep from getting hair all over the meat.
     
  7. oneshot 1

    oneshot 1 Well-Known Member

    Jun 11, 2003
    Ozarks
    I think I will wait until they start cutting Hickory's.

    I always cut Feet, Tail and Head off, cut across Back,put fingers in pull both ways.

    oneshot
     
  8. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Jan 7, 2010
    Northern Ozarks
    I shot 4 opening weekend....and they're already gone. I want to get out a couple more times before it becomes entirely too hot to suit me and bop a couple with the Rook rifle. I'll get the Southern Mountain flinter out this fall.

    Darren, this time of year around my place most of what I get are the young of the year, those really tender ones. For a little longer the young ones are easy to tell from the oldsters. Another few weeks and it will be a crapshoot.
     
  9. battman1

    battman1 Active Member

    Jan 29, 2007
    Ray Co. Mo.
    I need to get the dogs out and get after em.
     
  10. I have been wacking a few in defence of being overcome by them.I try to only shoot the little one but that does not always work out.
    My gal will eat them and she knows there tree rats.
     
  11. htredneck

    htredneck Well-Known Member

    Dec 9, 2008
    Cass County, MO
    Every time I walk past my .36 and my fowler both I swear I hear them call me names...
    They are ready to go, just have to have the time to do it. Boss lady is having her second knee replacement surgery here in a couple of days so I'm going to be pretty much grounded until dove season. Come this fall though I am going to give them a run for their money!
     
  12. htredneck

    htredneck Well-Known Member

    Dec 9, 2008
    Cass County, MO
    You left out the part about how to 'bark' them!
     
  13. henry

    henry Fan Boy aka Mr Twisty and

    If you're putting them in the stew pot the old boars work ok. Just leave them simmering longer. Just don't fry em unless you need to resole your shoes. :D
     
  14. sharps4590

    sharps4590 Well-Known Member

    Jan 7, 2010
    Northern Ozarks
    Mom always cooked the old ones in a pressure pot. That tenderized them pretty good.
     
  15. dhaverstick

    dhaverstick High-tech Hillbilly

    969
    Jan 12, 2012
    Fair Grove, MO
    The feller that's cooking them at the UBM Rendezvous this weekend is a master. He deep fries them in a fish cooker and then puts them in a big roaster with a little water in the bottom to keep the pieces warm. After about an hour of them being in that roaster, you just put a leg in your mouth and pull out the bone. My main focus will be on eating the mudbugs but, dang, it's hard to beat squirrel like that!

    Come on out and join us. Everyone is invited!

    Darren
     
  16. MOGC

    MOGC Well-Known Member

    Apr 13, 2008
    SE Ozark's
    Your method is right. If you want to stop getting hair on the meat before you start your cleaning dip the squirrel in water. I am always hunting near a river, spring creek or lake and I clean my squawks before I head for home. Immerse that squirrel in water and get him good and soaked before you start on him and your hairy meat days are over. It's amazing, I promise if you try it you'll never skin a dry squirrel again.
     
  17. rat

    rat Legbone

    Dec 13, 2005
    My grandma always fried them in a cast iron skillet, put them on a wire mesh rack over some water in another skillet, lid back on and it steamed them for a bit.... made gravy in the first skillet.