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You can ONLY imagine. Nobody has been able to tell us how long the immunity lasts from the vaccine or how often you will need a covid shot.
Nobody seems to be too worried about this also, which blows my mind...
Immunity will last until the next scare is politically advantageous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Immunity will last until the next scare is politically advantageous.
You could be right about this one.
The variants are another thing (albeit real) to keep people on their toes.
 

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I've been offered the shot 3 times by the VA and have turned it down each time.

As for the flu shot...never had one...never have had the flu and at this point will never have one.
Did you take the Polio vaccine???
 

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Sons in-laws grand pa 88 passed away Saturday and his father-in-law 65 today. Livingston county.
Convalescent Plasma Therapy was used successfully on an Aunt & Uncle of mine. They are in their mid 80’s both present with Co-Morbidities. Hate to hear that @Muleskinner were they vaccinated???
 

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Sons in-laws grand pa 88 passed away Saturday and his father-in-law 65 today. Livingston county.

Sorry to read this. Prayers for his family.

I've got a client in Chillicothe I was texting with last night. She said Livingston co had the highest rate of covid in the country right now. She works in healthcare & during the height of things, she was one of the people I talked to a lot for real information.
 

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The grandpa had when it first came out . But had other issues this was just the last straw I think. Dad I’m not sure . I think he waited to long before seeking help. Turned to pneumonia very quickly. @WBF
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Sorry to hear that Muleskinner. My mom had to go to Hedrick for some tests the other day and they were on very high alert there.

There is a LOT of through traffic right there at the intersection of 36 and 65. Maybe that has something to do with it?? Other than that, not much remarkable about Livingston county that would account for that much.
 

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They said last week that 33% of the population had been vaccinated in Linn and Livingston counties and that they felt it could be the Indian or UK variant.
 

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They said last week that 33% of the population had been vaccinated in Linn and Livingston counties and that they felt it could be the Indian or UK variant.
I also believe we are seeing the Indian variant. We have seen a big increase in SWMO, and I personally know of a co-worker who it doesn't look good. Giving a 100% oxygen, and kidneys are now shutting down. It's awful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Do we know what variants the current covid vaccine does not protect against?
 

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Not that I am aware of. But, I have been told that the vaccine was pretty potent against the UK and SA variants. Not sure about the Indian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Not that I am aware of. But, I have been told that the vaccine was pretty potent against the UK and SA variants. Not sure about the Indian.
What about this then...

If you test positive for antibodies, do you have the same protection as someone that took the vaccine?
I certainly dont know anything about this stuff, but if you have antibodies from covid infection, would you have the same protection as vaccine induced antibodies?

Here is some reading that sheds light on my original question...

"For the most part, the antibodies that you form from getting vaccinated are the same kind of antibodies you would get from a natural infection. One difference is that certain types of vaccines only show the immune system part of the relevant virus. Because of that, the immune system doesn’t form as many different types of antibodies as it would in the course of a natural infection.


However, this doesn’t mean that the antibodies formed are any less effective than those formed in a natural infection. To make a vaccine, researchers very carefully select a specific part of the virus that has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies to trigger an antibody response that effectively neutralizes the virus.3 It’s just that theoretically, someone who has been naturally infected might also have additional antibodies (many of which might be ineffective)."

and...

"Assessing Differences in Natural vs. Vaccine-Induced Immunity
In fact, an important topic for researchers are these potential differences in the protective immune response (including antibodies) between people who got an infection naturally and people who got a vaccine.


It is a very complex topic. You can’t just compare natural infection to vaccination, because not every vaccine has the same properties, and not every vaccine will trigger exactly the same immune response.


In some cases, a specific vaccine might not provide as effective of an antibody response as being naturally infected.3 But other times, the reverse might be the case, especially if a vaccine has been especially designed to provoke a strong response. We can’t make assumptions without studying the specific data over the long-term. "

 

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I'll give you my personal opinion on this with the understanding that I am not an immunologist. I know several and could get verification of your questions. Typically, when the body sees a foreign antigen, it initiates a primary immune response which promotes a buildup of IgM. IgM is a multivalent antibody (pentavalent with 10 hypervariable sites for antigen binding) that finds a best fit for that antigen. Now, if the body sees that particular antigen again, the body will initiate what would be defined a secondary response in which it will have an IgG release that fully recognizes from before that particular antigen or foreign host. IgG is bivalent with two hypervariable sites for antigen binding. My personal thoughts are that it would be better for you if you had previously had Covid-19 in terms of having a better fit for that antigen as opposed to the vaccine. But, this is a personal opinion of a guy that is not an immunologist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
I'll give you my personal opinion on this with the understanding that I am not an immunologist. I know several and could get verification of your questions. Typically, when the body sees a foreign antigen, it initiates a primary immune response which promotes a buildup of IgM. IgM is a multivalent antibody (pentavalent with 10 hypervariable sites for antigen binding) that finds a best fit for that antigen. Now, if the body sees that particular antigen again, the body will initiate what would be defined a secondary response in which it will have an IgG release that fully recognizes from before that particular antigen or foreign host. IgG is bivalent with two hypervariable sites for antigen binding. My personal thoughts are that it would be better for you if you had previously had Covid-19 in terms of having a better fit for that antigen as opposed to the vaccine. But, this is a personal opinion of a guy that is not an immunologist.
After a bit of reading (realizing that google doesnt mysteriously make me and expert like some think), that entire paragraph makes sense to me.

I think of it this way, and could be wrong. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the prevalent bug (or range of bugs) of the year. Sometimes its the same, sometimes its a different one. But you are recommended to get a flu shot every year, for this purpose (I think??).
For the Covid vaccine, could it be said that the spectrum of protection from SARS-CoV-2 and some variants yet immunity derived from natural infection could provide protection against a broader range of coronavirus infections??
I guess "could" is the operative word there obviously...

But I guess generally, what blows my mind is that people walk right in and get a covid vaccine. I have asked many like this what they said about how long the immunity lasts and when you need to get vaccinated again, and nobody knows (or seems to care). Wouldnt you want to know when your tank of gas runs out??
 

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I would depend on the medical professionals who told me I needed the first one to let me know if another was needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
I would depend on the medical professionals who told me I needed the first one to let me know if another was needed.
I dont follow...
 

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After a bit of reading (realizing that google doesnt mysteriously make me and expert like some think), that entire paragraph makes sense to me.

I think of it this way, and could be wrong. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the prevalent bug (or range of bugs) of the year. Sometimes its the same, sometimes its a different one. But you are recommended to get a flu shot every year, for this purpose (I think??).
For the Covid vaccine, could it be said that the spectrum of protection from SARS-CoV-2 and some variants yet immunity derived from natural infection could provide protection against a broader range of coronavirus infections??
I guess "could" is the operative word there obviously...

But I guess generally, what blows my mind is that people walk right in and get a covid vaccine. I have asked many like this what they said about how long the immunity lasts and when you need to get vaccinated again, and nobody knows (or seems to care). Wouldnt you want to know when your tank of gas runs out??

 
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