9mm wanted

Discussion in 'Wanted' started by wraytutt, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. wraytutt

    wraytutt New Member

    5
    Nov 5, 2010
    I am looking for a 9mm pistol. revolver (if they make one), semi-auto, any brand, I would like to stay around 200 dollars. Let me know what you got.
    Thanks
     
  2. best look at hi point for 200 bones :cheers:
     

  3. wraytutt

    wraytutt New Member

    5
    Nov 5, 2010
    I'm hoping somebody might have a used one of another brand. The local gun shop man didn't recommend hi-point for target shooting. I plan on 99.9% target shooting, the other 0.01% home defense
     
  4. Heck for 150 you can have a target gun the guys that have them love them those that dont hate them that seems to be my experience anyway i wouldnt carry it or have my life depend on one but for target shooting i dont see why not
     
  5. wraytutt

    wraytutt New Member

    5
    Nov 5, 2010
    that's good to hear. It is american made, I like that
     
  6. MJO21

    MJO21 Active Member

    Dec 12, 2008
    Union, MO
    From what I read the only people who really do not like Hi-point are people who do not have one. Go to the Hi-point forums and read up on them. My friend has one and swears by it, customer service is great, made in the USA, and Lifetime Warranty

    MJO
     
  7. Curtis

    Curtis Active Member

    There just aren't a lot of options out there for $200.


    My personal opinion would be to get a Makarov (the other 9mm)
     
  8. cshoff

    cshoff New Member

    Aug 25, 2009
    Gasconade County
    [rquote=1881743&tid=131044&author=MJO21]From what I read the only people who really do not like Hi-point are people who do not have one. Go to the Hi-point forums and read up on them. My friend has one and swears by it, customer service is great, made in the USA, and Lifetime Warranty

    MJO

    [/rquote]

    Actually owning a particular make and model of handgun is not a prerequisite to forming a valid opinion about the gun one way or the other. The Hi-Point is a inexpensive, cheaply made pistol. It has an overly heavy slide mass due it's blow-back design, a high bore axis, and a low ammunition capacity for it's size. In my experience, they have a off-balance feel to them due to the overly heavy slide mass. They are a bulky gun and they are not a design that would necessarily be conducive to concealed carry.

    That said, they seem to shoot accurately enough and the design seems fairly reliable. If you can get past the looks of the pistol and are just looking for a reasonably priced plinker, there is no reason why a Hi-Point shouldn't fill the bill. I would certainly feel confident openly carrying one as a general purpose hiking/camp gun and there is no reason they can't provide hours of enjoyment on the shooting range.
     
  9. buckwacker181

    buckwacker181 # of bans record holder

    Oct 9, 2006
    Catawussy
    Kel tec pf9 is your best bet in that price range.
     
  10. battman1

    battman1 Active Member

    Jan 29, 2007
    Ray Co. Mo.
    I heard that Great Guns had a couple Kel Tecs for like $250 or $275.I think they were used but not sure.
     
  11. knockemdeadd

    knockemdeadd New Member

    Feb 3, 2007
    Arnold(St Louis)
    [rquote=1881771&tid=131044&author=cshoff][rquote=1881743&tid=131044&author=MJO21]From what I read the only people who really do not like Hi-point are people who do not have one. Go to the Hi-point forums and read up on them. My friend has one and swears by it, customer service is great, made in the USA, and Lifetime Warranty

    MJO

    [/rquote]

    Actually owning a particular make and model of handgun is not a prerequisite to forming a valid opinion about the gun one way or the other. The Hi-Point is a inexpensive, cheaply made pistol. It has an overly heavy slide mass due it's blow-back design, a high bore axis, and a low ammunition capacity for it's size. In my experience, they have a off-balance feel to them due to the overly heavy slide mass. They are a bulky gun and they are not a design that would necessarily be conducive to concealed carry.

    That said, they seem to shoot accurately enough and the design seems fairly reliable. If you can get past the looks of the pistol and are just looking for a reasonably priced plinker, there is no reason why a Hi-Point shouldn't fill the bill. I would certainly feel confident openly carrying one as a general purpose hiking/camp gun and there is no reason they can't provide hours of enjoyment on the shooting range. [/rquote]

    Actually owning a particular make and model of handgun is not a prerequisite to forming a valid opinion about the gun one way or the other.

    Actually, thats the BEST way to form an opinion, ownership.
     
  12. knockemdeadd

    knockemdeadd New Member

    Feb 3, 2007
    Arnold(St Louis)
    wray, when i was looking, i looked at those pistols. you'll notice a VERY big difference in them, and the higher priced ones. only you can decide....

    the gun shop i was in, they ALL carried Glock, on their hip. of course, i'd heard of Glock, and that sent a pretty clear message to me.

    one guy though, told me something that i'll never forget...."How much is your life worth"? thats not to say that Glocks NEVER fail, i'd guess (since i didnt research it), that your percentages go way down, with the lesser guns...as far as reliability.

    only you can decide that part......:02:
     
  13. cshoff

    cshoff New Member

    Aug 25, 2009
    Gasconade County
    [rquote=1882045&tid=131044&author=knockemdeadd]


    Actually, thats the BEST way to form an opinion, ownership.[/rquote]

    It is quite possible to spend some time on the range with a gun and form a valid opinion about it. Face it, there are many products we've all formed valid opinions on that we've never actually owned. It may be that we've had friends that owned a product and we were exposed to it or had an opportunity to use it, or perhaps it's something we've rented, or whatever. In reality, ownership gives you a financial and sentimental stake in a particular product and often causes you to have a very biased opinion towards it as a defense mechanism for justifying your purchase.
     
  14. knockemdeadd

    knockemdeadd New Member

    Feb 3, 2007
    Arnold(St Louis)
    [rquote=1882125&tid=131044&author=cshoff][rquote=1882045&tid=131044&author=knockemdeadd]


    Actually, thats the BEST way to form an opinion, ownership.[/rquote]

    It is quite possible to spend some time on the range with a gun and form a valid opinion about it. Face it, there are many products we've all formed valid opinions on that we've never actually owned. It may be that we've had friends that owned a product and we were exposed to it or had an opportunity to use it, or perhaps it's something we've rented, or whatever. In reality, ownership gives you a financial and sentimental stake in a particular product and often causes you to have a very biased opinion towards it as a defense mechanism for justifying your purchase. [/rquote]

    Yes, we all form opinions, but thats not saying they're "valid". by ownership, you have the time necessary to form "valid" opinions, after you've put it through the paces.

    Otherwise, its "hearsay", and renting a gun hardly gives you enough time to form a "valid" opinion, although its a good start, a basis....
     
  15. cshoff

    cshoff New Member

    Aug 25, 2009
    Gasconade County
    [rquote=1882139&tid=131044&author=knockemdeadd]

    Yes, we all form opinions, but thats not saying they're "valid". by ownership, you have the time necessary to form "valid" opinions, after you've put it through the paces.

    Otherwise, its "hearsay", and renting a gun hardly gives you enough time to form a "valid" opinion, although its a good start, a basis....[/rquote]

    That's just nonsense. I'm not sure what kind of "experience" you think it takes to form a valid opinion about a particular gun, but a person could certainly spend a couple hours on the range with a gun and "put it through it's paces" and have a FAR better understanding of it's attributes than a person who has owned the same gun for two years but has only shot a magazine full of ammo through it in that time. Ownership gives you nothing more than a financial and sentimental stake in the gun. Only through USE can you develop an informed opinion.
     
  16. Cook

    Cook Active Member

    May 28, 2003
    It has an overly heavy slide mass due it's blow-back design, a high bore axis, and a low ammunition capacity for it's size. In my experience, they have a off-balance feel to them due to the overly heavy slide mass. They are a bulky gun and they are not a design that would necessarily be conducive to concealed carry

    No dog in this fight,just want to learn,
    What is a "high bore axis" and what does it affect?
     
  17. knockemdeadd

    knockemdeadd New Member

    Feb 3, 2007
    Arnold(St Louis)
    [rquote=1882145&tid=131044&author=cshoff][rquote=1882139&tid=131044&author=knockemdeadd]

    Yes, we all form opinions, but thats not saying they're "valid". by ownership, you have the time necessary to form "valid" opinions, after you've put it through the paces.

    Otherwise, its "hearsay", and renting a gun hardly gives you enough time to form a "valid" opinion, although its a good start, a basis....[/rquote]

    That's just nonsense. I'm not sure what kind of "experience" you think it takes to form a valid opinion about a particular gun, but a person could certainly spend a couple hours on the range with a gun and "put it through it's paces" and have a FAR better understanding of it's attributes than a person who has owned the same gun for two years but has only shot a magazine full of ammo through it in that time. Ownership gives you nothing more than a financial and sentimental stake in the gun. Only through USE can you develop an informed opinion. [/rquote]

    Thats just nonsense, to assume that a rental guy spends a couple hours on the range putting it through its paces, while the owner of 2 years, has only shot a magazine full. One would naturally assume just the opposite.

    Present the question that way, and the valid opinions sure change :wave:

    :smiley: ive got nothing wray, ive never shot the high point
     
  18. cshoff

    cshoff New Member

    Aug 25, 2009
    Gasconade County
    [rquote=1882186&tid=131044&author=Cook]
    No dog in this fight,just want to learn,
    What is a "high bore axis" and what does it affect?[/rquote]

    In a nutshell, it is the distance from the center of the bore to the highest point you can grip on the backstrap of the gun. Generally speaking, the lower the bore axis, the easier the human hand(s) and arm(s) can control recoil (all else being equal). A higher bore axis, on the other hand, gives the recoil more leverage against your grip thereby making recoil more difficult to manage.
     
  19. cshoff

    cshoff New Member

    Aug 25, 2009
    Gasconade County
    [rquote=1882193&tid=131044&author=knockemdeadd]
    Thats just nonsense, to assume that a rental guy spends a couple hours on the range putting it through its paces, while the owner of 2 years, has only shot a magazine full. One would naturally assume just the opposite.

    Present the question that way, and the valid opinions sure change :wave:

    :smiley: ive got nothing wray, ive never shot the high point[/rquote]

    Except that in many cases, that is absolutely how it ends up. I know numerous people who have guns in their gun safe that they have had for years and only shot a very small amount of ammunition through, and some who have unfired guns in their safe that have been sitting for years. Should I trust those people to give me a valid, informed opinion about those guns, or would I be better off to consider the opinion of someone who doesn't own the gun but has a couple hundred rounds of trigger time under their belt?

    You made the statement that the "BEST" way to form an opinion was by ownership, as if "ownership" itself was a necessary criteria for being able to rate the quality of a gun. In reality, it is not a requirement at all.
     
  20. Curtis

    Curtis Active Member

    For that matter, just handling a gun at the store tells you a lot about the feel and quality of it.

    There are many guns I request to look at, hold it for 2 seconds, and tell the the clerk to put this piece of junk back in the case :thinking:
    Many guns I say "wow, I really like this. I'm going to put it on my short list"

    You can guess which gun I would recommend someone look at...