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I wish I'd be better about before and after pics. We've made a couple of huge strides in our TSI this year after spending 3 years just cutting cedar. We cherry picked the best south & southwest slopes for bedding areas. It's nice to move onto hard/whitewood species and cover some acres. Spending weekends cutting in a dense cedar thicket is just not all that much fun, necessary evil but just not much fun.
 

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I wish I'd be better about before and after pics. We've made a couple of huge strides in our TSI this year after spending 3 years just cutting cedar. We cherry picked the best south & southwest slopes for bedding areas. It's nice to move onto hard/whitewood species and cover some acres. Spending weekends cutting in a dense cedar thicket is just not all that much fun, necessary evil but just not much fun.
So what do you look for/focus on on these south facing slopes.
 

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So what do you look for/focus on on these south facing slopes.
Deer beds. If they're already using it as a bedding area, enhancing the ground/security cover by dropping trees. Also opening the canopy up will allow the understory to flourish and it will get better and better adding browse. Also releasing oaks/mast producing trees will be very beneficial.
Not every southerly slope is a being area so it's better to find existing ones and work with what's there IMO.
 

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That elm stump will grow you some great browse.
 

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So this is probably a dumb question, but are you all marking these trees during the growing season in some way or another? I can pretty easily tell the bark apart with mature trees, but struggle with young ones.

I get paranoid of cutting down young oaks by mistake. Just curious how others are doing it or if they just know the trees better than I.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
So this is probably a dumb question, but are you all marking these trees during the growing season in some way or another? I can pretty easily tell the bark apart with mature trees, but struggle with young ones.

I get paranoid of cutting down young oaks by mistake. Just curious how others are doing it or if they just know the trees better than I.
I don't mark them during the growing season, but that is a good idea for someone starting out to help identify.

Marking trees during the growing season helps identify them once they drop their leaves and train the eye on what to look for.
 

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Can’t speak for all but for me, in Camden county, it’s so thick in the timber I’m just looking for the best young stock of white oak in the canopy openings, others get sawed down. Places where the mature trees are thick, as you said it’s not too hard to tell em apart.
 
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