11/11/40

Discussion in 'Duck & Goose Hunting' started by DADAKOTA, Nov 10, 2010.

  1. DADAKOTA

    DADAKOTA Active Member

    Apr 18, 2006
    70 years ago tomorrow marks one of the greatest tragedies to strike the upper Mississippi valley. The great Armistice Day storm of 1940. Many duckhunters lost their lives on a day that started out as shirt sleeve whether and turned into a raging blizzard. By all accounts the ducks flew like crazy and folks stayed out till it was too late. Folks hid under their boats and burned their decoys in an attempt to stay warm. Some walked out the next day across ice that was raging water the day before. Here's too all who hunt and fish and may they all return safely from their outings.:cheers:
     
  2. BILLYGOAT

    BILLYGOAT New Member

    :cheers: have heard many stories about that storm and hope me or anybody i know never have to go through anything like that.
     

  3. Skduckhunt

    Skduckhunt Senior Member

    Dec 29, 2002
    St. Charles, Mo
    reading the accounts and articles on that storm just puts a somber chill up the spine.. some of the photos are harsh and almost grotesque.

    here is one account'

    The "storm" of November 11, 1940 was one of the worst storms in the recorded history of Lake Michigan. In all, the storm claimed 5 vessels, and 66 lives. The storm occurred on Armistice Day, which celebrated the end of World War I in 1918.

    The storm hit late Monday afternoon, November 11th, with winds of hurricane proportions. The winds struck suddenly from the southwest at about 2:30 P.M. and were accompanied by drenching rain, which later changed to snow. The winds reached peak velocities of 75 miles per hour, the highest in local maritime history. Telephone and power lines were down by the hundreds around Mason County. Several local firms had "gaping" holes where roofs once were. Trees were uprooted, small buildings were overturned, and brick walls were toppled, causing at least 1 serious injury. Very few places escaped without damage. Ludington, on the morning of November 12th, appeared to be a deserted city.

    The Pere Marquette carferry City of Flint 32, attempted to make the harbor but wound up on the beach about 300 yards from the shore. She was ordered by her relief captain, Jens Vevang, to be scuttled to avoid being pounded by the incoming seas. On November 12th, a breeches buoy was strung and 27 year old crewman Ernest Delotowski of 406 First Street, Ludington, was brought ashore. Delatowski made a good portion of the trip in the icy waters of Lake Michigan. As a precautionary measure, he was taken to Paulina Stearns Hospital and was released later that day. He said he carried a message with him, but it got lost in the water. Later the buoy was used to carry a message to the ship, and then crewman Luther Ryder of S. Washington Avenue (Ludington) was brought ashore.

    On November 14th, after the storm was over, she was pulled off the beach by the tug "Cushing" with the help of the Pere Marquette 21. After a preliminary inspection at Ludington, where sheets of ice and mud were removed, she was taken to the Manitowoc shipyard, and was found to be virtually undamaged.

    The City of Flint 32 remained in service until 1967. She was sold in 1969 to the Norfolk & Western Railway Company, and converted to the river ferry barge "Roanoke".

    PM CARFERRY FLEET RECORD INTACT

    The Pere Marquette carferry fleet kept it's remarkable record intact, sending out at least 1 ship per day in all kinds of weather. The Pere Marquette 21 departed Ludington late on November 12th. She was the only one to sail that day. The Pere Marquette 18 and the City of Saginaw 31 arrived Ludington early on November 13th. The 31 departed Ludington to Milwaukee later that day. The Pere Marquette 22 was also once again in regular service.

    photos @ the following site
    http://www.carferries.com/armistice/
     
  4. mohunter32

    mohunter32 Senior Member Lifetime Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2005
    Franklin Co, MO
    This is the first I've ever heard of it.
     
  5. Hmmmmmm learn something new everyday never know anything about this sad event
     
  6. BILLYGOAT

    BILLYGOAT New Member

    it was a rough time for sure.there are a ton of stories on the net about it.check it out if you want some good reading.
     
  7. huntforfunnfood

    huntforfunnfood New Member

    Jun 30, 2003
    new bloomfield mo
    A total of 154 deaths were blamed on the storm, with the following instances being noteworthy:

    Along the Mississippi River several hundred duck hunters had taken time off from work and school to take advantage of the ideal hunting conditions. Weather forecasters had not predicted the severity of the oncoming storm, and as a result many of the hunters were not dressed for cold weather. When the storm began many hunters took shelter on small islands in the Mississippi River, and the 50 mph (80 km/h) winds and 5-foot (1.5 m) waves overcame their encampments. Some became stranded on the islands and then froze to death in the single-digit temperatures that moved in over night. Others tried to make it to shore and drowned. Duck hunters constituted about half of the 49 deaths in Minnesota. Those who survived told of how ducks came south with the storm by the thousands, and everybody could have shot their daily limit had they not been focused on survival. Casualties were lessened by the efforts of Max Conrad, a pioneering light plane pilot based in Winona, Minnesota, 25 miles upriver from LaCrosse. He flew up and down the river in the wake of the storm, locating survivors and dropping supplies to them
     
  8. Vector

    Vector VECtor Custom Calls

    Feb 11, 2003
    N/C MO
  9. Skduckhunt

    Skduckhunt Senior Member

    Dec 29, 2002
    St. Charles, Mo
    Be careful out there!!!
     
  10. DADAKOTA

    DADAKOTA Active Member

    Apr 18, 2006
    It has become part of the history of duck hunters and duck hunting. My Dad has talked of this event for as long as I can remember. Folks back then were a whole lot tougher breed than we are today. :cheers:
     
  11. winger

    winger New Member

    Oct 24, 2003
    yep, my grandad used to talk about that. i have read articles. bad deal for sure. read a recent article saying that they weren't as well prepared with the type of clothing and equipment as we have today to stay warm (duh) however something like that happens very little is gonna help much except the warmth of the truck or home.
     
  12. Son_of_Cold_Duck

    Son_of_Cold_Duck 1:8655 idiots right Red?

    Dec 16, 2008
    i\'m skeeered
    [rquote=1890947&tid=131694&author=winger]yep, my grandad used to talk about that. i have read articles. bad deal for sure. read a recent article saying that they weren't as well prepared with the type of clothing and equipment as we have today to stay warm (duh) however something like that happens very little is gonna help much except the warmth of the truck or home.[/rquote]

    is that the same story you tell each time trying to get us to :grouphug: in the blind cuz you get cold? :confused:

    :praying: to those that lost their lives
     
  13. winger

    winger New Member

    Oct 24, 2003
    [rquote=1891734&tid=131694&author=Son_of_Cold_Duck][rquote=1890947&tid=131694&author=winger]yep, my grandad used to talk about that. i have read articles. bad deal for sure. read a recent article saying that they weren't as well prepared with the type of clothing and equipment as we have today to stay warm (duh) however something like that happens very little is gonna help much except the warmth of the truck or home.[/rquote]

    is that the same story you tell each time trying to get us to :grouphug: in the blind cuz you get cold? :confused:

    :praying: to those that lost their lives[/rquote]

    with you're digestive track problems every time you duck hunt, i am thinking i would just go ahead and freeze before i subjected myself to that in close quarters
     
  14. Original Al

    Original Al New Member

    I re-read the story every year. Makes you feel colder just reading about all the snow and ice
     
  15. Skduckhunt

    Skduckhunt Senior Member

    Dec 29, 2002
    St. Charles, Mo
    Dadakota,

    thanks for starting this thread....
     
  16. Pastor

    Pastor Well-Known Member

    Apr 2, 2008
    Leadwood.
    they had an article on this in a recent wildfowl mag.
     
  17. DADAKOTA

    DADAKOTA Active Member

    Apr 18, 2006
    It is part of the history of duck hunting and something no one should forget.:cheers:
     
  18. Judah

    Judah Crossbow supporter

    Oct 19, 2007
    Warren County
    Very sobering read.