Articles

  1. Tips and Tricks for Keeping Warm

    Thus far this fall, the weather in Missouri hasn't been too bad. Though the temperatures are dipping, the worst is by far yet to come, but what are you going to do when it gets here? As you spend time hunting and camping in the wilderness, staying warm is essential to not only extending your time in the woods but also your health and wellbeing right on up to and including ensuring your survival. In order to make the most of your hunting season and maintain good health throughout, you're...
  2. Regulation Changes for the 2016-2017 Season

    From time to time, hunting regulations are changed within Missouri. Taken into account when making these changes is what is best for both hunters and the management of deer herds along with a focus on the current state of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) within the state. At this time, the Missouri Department of Conservation is looking at implementing changes to the Code of State Regulations that will go into effect for the 2016-2017 hunting season. The upcoming changes that could impact you as...
  3. MDC Asks Hunters to Collar Colared Deer

    At one time or another, we've all seen something strange or unexpected in the woods. Sometimes we may gravitate towards the unusual whereas in other cases, the inclination may to be to gravitate away. A potentially uncommon sight, for example, could be a deer wearing a collar, but this is not something that Missouri hunters should avoid. In fact, quite the opposite is being encouraged in that you should collar that collared deer just as you would any other. The Missouri Department of...
  4. Options for Easier Deer Skinning

    There's an old saying to the effect that there's more than one way to skin a cat. Well, as luck would have it, there is also more than one way to skin a deer. Depending on your level of commitment and the tools you have access to, skinning a deer can be an arduous process or one that goes by rather quickly. When it comes to skinning deer, like with all things in life, it is good to have options, and here are a few you may wish to add to your deer skinning arsenal. One way to skin a deer...
  5. The Worst Hunting Buddies Ever: Uninvited Missouri Spiders

    There are many types of wildlife you may encounter in your quest for deer in Missouri. It could be that you come across a squirrel or a raccoon or something else entirely, up to and including the creepiest and crawliest of things. A good example of a creature that embodies all things creepy and crawly is the spider and Missouri has plenty of them. Spiders big and small call the Show Me State their home with a total of arachnid residents including more than 300 different varieties. Chances...
  6. Tips for Successfully Following a Blood Trail

    Although we tend to discuss well-placed shots from a long gun or bow as the key to successful hunting, there is actually another skill we need to develop at the same time. In many cases, a good shot can be achieved but instant death is not the result. Even well-placed shots can lead to deer than bolt a ways before they succumb, and in order to find that deer you're going to need to develop a set of skills to successfully follow the blood trail to your kill. The first thing to do once you...
  7. Selecting and Preparing a Hunting Pack

    Hunting whitetail in Missouri is an activity that requires a fair amount of gear. Depending on your set up, you may be carrying that gear with you each time you set out into the field or instead you may store it at a hunting camp in the middle of the wilderness. Though we all have our preferred methods, one thing we should remember is that as human beings, there are times when we quite simply are prone to forgetting something. There are a lot of reasons we may forget an item we desperately...
  8. Stalking Skills to Master

    It is no secret amongst hunters that a whitetail that knows you're coming is a whitetail on the move away from you. Whether is it sight, sound, or smell that gives you away, a whitetail deer is simply not going to sit around in the Missouri woods waiting to become prey. Instead these animals move their feet opposite of you, the perceived threat, in search of safe haven. Though it can be very frustrating when deer evade to the point where you cannot get a decent shot, you should take these...
  9. Find Projectile Fragments Inside your Missouri Whitetail Harvest with a Metal Detector

    Imagine sitting down to a long awaited meal consisting of meat from your first whitetail of the season. Undoubtedly you will be salivating over that dinner, waiting anxiously as it cooks until it is finally ready to consume. When you sit down at long last for the first much anticipated bite, you close your teeth on something unexpected. Instead of tender, juicy meat between your chompers, there is a bullet fragment or piece of shot. Though this type of discovery is unpleasant, it can be...
  10. DIY Deer Licks

    There are many types of deer licks we as hunters put out for whitetails to consume. Although there are many benefits to gain from the use of deer licks, it is safe to say they can get pretty expensive. Sure, they are worth the added expense, but what if you could save a few bucks? The good news you can if you're willing to try a do-it-yourself approach. If you were to stop and read the ingredient list on deer licks, chances are you're going to recognize a lot of what you see. In fact, you...
  11. Preserve Venison Outside of the Freezer by Pressure Canning

    After each successful hunt, we bring home meat for the freezer. We stock every nook and cranny until freezer space is whittled away, leaving us without storage for any other game we harvest as well as any grocery store buys. Although most would find no issue with a freezer full of meat, at some point it becomes necessary to find alternative means of venison preservation, such as pressure canning. There are a lot of very good reasons to can deer meat aside from freeing up space in the...
  12. Reading Whitetail Body Language

    There are a lot of things a buck will do, one of which is let you know exactly what's on his mind. The catch is that you have to know how to pick up on his cues. Although some game animals will vocalize and therefore give you an idea as to what their state of mind might be, that is not something that happens with whitetail deer. Instead of using your ears to understand the mood and intentions of deer, you are going to have to use your eyes to recognize and understand their actions....
  13. Don't Let Summer Scouting Opportunities Pass You By

    If you haven't set out to scout whitetails yet this summer, the window for doing so is rapidly closing. As of now, the weather is cooperative, food sources are plentiful, and even if deer do spot you, it is still early enough in the year that they will maintain or quickly revert to their normal behaviors. Therefore, if you want to get an idea of what deer in your area will be looking like this season and where the prime hunting areas will be, it is time to go see for yourself as the first...
  14. Whitetails, Camo, and Pythons? Oh My...

    When you're out in the woods preparing for the upcoming hunting season, you may encounter a thing or two that leaves you scratching your head. Nature has a way of producing some interesting sights as well as some downright unpleasant ones that you'd prefer not to see. One of the later is a python on the loose in Missouri. Though your first thought may be to laugh off the presence of a python wandering about in Missouri, such a case has actually existed recently. In Warren County near...
  15. The Ethics of Long Range Shooting

    Historically hunting has been referred to as a sport and hunters dubbed sportsmen. As with all sports, there is a certain expectation of behavior to include things such as fairness, ethics, and morals. Since the act of hunting involves taking the life of an animal, it is only natural to expect those engaged in a hunt to operate in a manner that encompasses all of these behaviors. However, that is not always the case when it comes to long range shooting. We currently live in a day and age...
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