Featured MO Deer Hunting History - from the Mo Conservationist archives

Discussion in 'Whitetails General' started by bajabill, Jul 23, 2015.

  1. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    Missouri "nimrods" relied on the MDC for their information regarding the location of the states highest deer concentrations.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
  2. BustinBucks

    BustinBucks #MakeMWTGreatAgain

    Jul 31, 2006
    Eagleville, MO
    #HerdDynamics
     

  3. MeatHunter

    MeatHunter Just Livin' The Dream!!!

    Dec 7, 2011
    You make some good finds! I enjoy these posts! :)
     
  4. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    just ask how?? But for now I will keep supplying the fish. :)

    I also learned I am not too old that the colloquial use of the term nimrod took me by surprise. The first time I read it they were referring to people road hunting so I though, that was kind of harsh and lacking of our current political correctness. Then, saw it again in a much more favorable use referring to all MO hunters and I had to rely on todays encyclopedia.
     
  5. mrtrailcam1

    mrtrailcam1 New Member

    Jun 2, 2012
    How can we get a copy of that map, would be nice to have one framed on the wall. Thanks for posting it.

    Signed..Nimrod
     
  6. PHhunter

    PHhunter MOD-ER-ATOR

    Jan 22, 2007
    Woods.
    Hunting season out of the rut.....awesome. Right 20?
     
  7. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    I think it was 5 days, starting on Monday.
     
  8. horntagger

    horntagger New Member

    Jun 30, 2003
    Southeast Missouri
    Make sense even back then they new to have hunting season out of the rut.

    Where did you get that very cool map?

    Also look same counties with the highest poachers! That makes sense also.
     
  9. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    by 1950, back to November. Slight changes in the herd showed up in Osage County, maybe that is the heart of poaching :eek:
     

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  10. HomebrewDad

    HomebrewDad Active Member

    Mar 20, 2014
    Deer only lived south of the Missouri river in the 40's and 50's? Hmmm...
     
  11. trapperBR549

    trapperBR549 New Member

    May 17, 2007
    mo
    Maybe not "only lived" but were only hunted there, legally at least.
     
  12. HomebrewDad

    HomebrewDad Active Member

    Mar 20, 2014
    I've only in MO for a couple years. Why couldn't you hunt north of the Missouri back then? Were populations not what they are now?
     
  13. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    ask and you shall learn, :)


    A very good synopsis of the deer herd reintroduction, written by Dunbar Robb in the 1952 October Missouri Conservationist. Text cut and pasted in the following posts, sorry for the lack of formatting, the paragraph control was lost.
     

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  14. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    Some Prospects On Deer By Dunbar Robb Chief Biologist — Mammal Unit

    Many readers of The Conservationist know that our original deer population was most plentiful on the richer agricultural lands north of the Missouri river. They have heard, also, of how this population declined as a result of year-around hunting, primarily to supply the large commercial markets. Some of them know from personal experience the remnant Ozark herds of the 1920's and '30's. But today's contribution to the history of Missouri's deer herd is an exact reversal of the former trend. Our whitetail deer population is on the increase. It is building up concentrations in many favorable parts of the state, and is constantly spreading into territory where deer haven't been seen for almost half a century. Naturally, these changes are raising many questions as to what the future will bring. Some of the answers are clearly indicated by an analysis of present trends in the deer herd and in the policies of its management. But an over-all review of our deer situation may help to clarify a few of the less obvious points. Deer hunting regulations of recent years have demonstrated one of the Commission's policies which will have an important bearing on many different aspects of our herd's future. Briefly stated, this policy is to annually adjust open seasons on the basis of current conditions. This is the only procedure which will keep waste at a minimum and guarantee our licensed hunters the greatest number of "take home" deer over the years. But its effects can be even more far reaching, as it's also the only proper way to avoid the problems of range destruction, crop damage and poor reproduction. Another closely related practice is the addition of new counties to the hunting territory as soon as their populations can afford a reasonable amount of hunting, and before large deer concentrations are built up. This also involves the termination of deer refuges which have accomplished their objective of re-establishing local herds. Action of the latter type has already been taken, particularly in the case of many of the smaller, temporary refuges which have already made their contributions to the success of the deer redistribution program. Inviolate refuges are not necessary to the proper management of an established, growing deer herd, and we can expect the reasons behind this policy to apply to the larger state-owned tracts as well, in future years. Minnesota has had to permit deer hunting on several state parks in an effort to save the native vegetation that made the areas attractive recreational areas. Virginia has recently begun the practice of managed hunts on one of her heavily stocked big game refuges. Missouri, since 1944, has returned more than 162,000 acres of deer refuge to hunting territory, and another 50,000 acres will probably be added to this figure before the 1952 season opens. Contrary to popular belief, a county does not long benefit appreciably from a well-stocked refuge. Deer raised locally do not spread readily to repopulate large territories. Provisions have to be made for harvesting the crop where it is grown. Live-trapping can make part of the surplus available for restocking desirable range where deer are scarce. However, this practice can't keep ahead of a normal population increase. We have been creating new herds by releasing deer in our most suitable areas for the past 14 years. We do not intend to continue this program by planting them in predominantly agricultural regions, so the end of any real need for redistribution, and also for stock for this'purpose, is already in sight. We must, therefore, eventually harvest deer on all of our refuges. Removal of deer from a protected area can be accomplished in two ways: by completely terminating the refuge; or by permitting a controled hunt on those areas which should be maintained as refuges for other species, particularly the wild turkey. On first consideration, the activity associated with a deer hunt might seem highly undesirable on an area being managed for turkey production. Undoubtedly there would be some disturbance of the birds for the short period of the hunt. But it is also true that our turkey management is concentrating on the production of highly nutritious foods, and that a large deer population prevents the turkeys from getting the desired benefit of such plantings. In short, deer should be kept in balance with other desirable species on the refuge, just like they have to be kept in balance with agricultural practices on other parts of their range. The restocking program of past years has extended our occupied deer range to the Oklahoma line in the southwest. It has made releases in Hickory, Benton and Johnson counties in the more central part of the state. We don't have to move much farther westward to reach the marginal deer range of the prairie country along the Kansas line. A few more releases in this general region are now under consideration; but on the whole, the restocking of the southwest quarter of the state has been pretty well taken care of. Page
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2015
  15. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    The deer herd has already been re-established in most of the suitable areas of north Missouri. Deer need woody food in their range, and the prairie regions of our state have limited possibilities. In such areas, interference by any sizable number of deer with agricultural crop production could far outweigh the recreational benefits the herd could offer. Deer will spread to these areas, however, and they will have to be harvested there to keep the herd under control. But we cannot expect them to carry the herds or to provide the hunting that will be available in the more heavily wooded sections of our state. Most of north Missouri's deer will be found in country not unlike parts of our Ozark and Ozark Border regions. These areas can provide the type of hunting we've grown accustomed to in recent years. But when deer snread to adjoining prairie or agricultural areas, these too must be opened to hunting. When this time comes, neoole should not worry about the fact that the deer are not yet evenly distributed over the country. In each case the local herd should be balanced with local conditions and the harvest necessary to do this is a must. Another release or two in the northeast will permit the joining of future hunting territory along the Mississippi with that of the Missouri river hills, and all of this region has a greater potential for deer population than many persons realize. But releases already made in Lewis county in the northeast and in Livingston county in the northwest will probably provide deer for all suitable range in their parts of the state. We will not need to go much beyond these counties in planning further restocking
     

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  16. bajabill

    bajabill BDR529

    Feb 16, 2012
    East Central MO
    Some localities in extreme southeast Missouri will probably support small deer herds in future years, but the generally open, agricultural nature of this region would work against any efforts to make it a real deer producing area. One release has already been made on the east side of the St. Francis river in Stoddard county. The success of this restocking is evident by the way in which the whitetails have occupied the good deer range of that vicinity. But their chances of finding real deer territory in many other parts of the county are not good, and it is probable that land use practices will restrict the southeast's deer hunting country to about its present range. The immediate prospects for the coming season are very good. Our herd is continuing to increase. But, as usual, the individual hunter's chances for success will depend to a large extent upon the way in which he prepares himself for the hunt. Rifle sights should be checked on a suitable range. Arrangements should be made for a hunting area, and once this is decided, some knowledge of its topography, cover and deer use should be obtained. These things can't be done in an evening at home, but most of them could be taken care of by spending an early fall week-end in the deer woods. Realizing this, the Commission has made every effort to provide prospective hunters with information on the 1952 deer season as early as possible. The hunting period is always of considerable interest since many persons are faced with the need for scheduling some of their vacation to cover this activity. Firearms hunters have been given November 6, 7 and 8 this year —three days which include the Saturday closing so urgently requested by many sportsmen's groups. Archers were granted the period of October 16 through 31; they can choose their hunting territory from the opportunities offered in Crawford, Franklin, Jefferson, Ste. Genevieve and Washington counties. The taking of deer of any age or sex, which proved so successful in 1951, will be permitted this season in 23 of the open counties. These, together with the 19 additional counties in which bucks with at least one forked horn will be the legal targets, are shown on the accompanying map. In all, 42 counties have been placed in this year's hunting territory, and it seems appropriate, right here, to urge farmers who live in this area and have sustained crop damage to encourage a liberal harvest on their lands this fall. The history of an expanding herd and of its recent rapid increase is easily seen by a look at the records of our hunting territory. Twenty counties were on the list when the resumption of big game hunting was first announced in this state in 1944. Phelps, the only addition of 1945, was the 21st in which an open season was permitted. Two years later, the Commission was able to increase the total to 25; in 1950, deer were legally harvested throughout a 26-county area. The big step forward of 1951 was, of course, the declaration of an any-deer season. That law applied in 15 of our best stocked counties, but the fact that the "bucks only" territory was expanded through the addition of six new counties should not be overlooked. This year, a record increase in hunting area is brought about by the listing of 10 new counties. Of these, Cole and Pulaski are most notable because they go directly into the any- deer zone, while Douglas, Howell, Maries, Osage, Texas and Wayne counties have been moved from "bucks only" territory and placed under the more liberal regulation. However, eight other counties are being added to the "bucks only" list. Progress in deer herd restoration has permitted us to more than double the size of Missouri's hunting territory in the last nine years. There will be deer hunting (bucks only) this year in the river-break country of Boone, Callaway, Montgomery and Warren counties for the first time since the early 1900's—and this area is not unlike the timbered Ozark area more familiar to most deer hunters. Missouri's deer herd is not uniformly distributed, even within some of our better deer counties. But the declaration of an any-deer season is clearly justified as soon as the herd is firmly established and ready to support a good harvest. The landowner can further restrict the harvest on his land if he so desires. The any-deer regulation gives him latitude within which to manage the herd on his property by laying down rules under which his guests may hunt. He should remember, however, that the harvest of both sexes in adequate numbers is inevitable if he wants to hold his herd to a size that is not burdensome. Probably the most significant part of the new regulation is the provision for the resumption of deer hunting in Livingston, Chariton, Boone, Callaway, Montgomery and Warren counties. These counties are in the bucks- only territory, but the important point is that they will be offering the first north Missouri hunting since the early 1900's. They should produce a good harvest, and I predict that some extremely large deer will be taken. Another good possibility is that a number of tagged deer will be taken in the 10 counties where hunting is being permitted for the first time. In these areas, the present herds are made up almost entirely of the increase from deer released during the last five or six years. All animals handled in the redistribution program are marked with a serially-numbered aluminum ear tag, and the Commission would appreciate receiving all available information on any of these which are taken. In return, we will be glad to tell the successful hunter where and when his deer was trapped and released. Other features of this year's regulation are the same as those of 1951. Hunting time begins at 6:30 a. m. and closes at 5:00 p. m. each day. Firearms requirements have not been changed, and the hunting permit must be attached to the deer immediately after the animal is killed. Hunters must have their deer inspected and stamped by an authorized agent of the Commission within 12 hours after making the kill, and the report card (Continued on page 12) Page 3
     
  17. callaojoe

    callaojoe Máistir an pointe hocht.

    Jan 21, 2004
    N/C Missouri
    Pretty much the way the herd is today, herd dynamics maybe not as dynamic as some have thought... :shrug:
     
  18. jawesome357

    jawesome357 The Instigator

    Oct 31, 2013
    The only OC

    I would put $100 on it that this is a correct statement!:D:wave:
     
  19. HomebrewDad

    HomebrewDad Active Member

    Mar 20, 2014
    Interesting read. Thank you.
     
  20. 20 feet high

    20 feet high CROSSBOW HATER!

    Feb 19, 2009
    favorable:p