Honeysuckle question

Discussion in 'Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation' started by Ozarks-Bowhunter, Dec 28, 2009.

  1. Ozarks-Bowhunter

    Ozarks-Bowhunter Active Member

    Jan 28, 2006
    Southern Missouri
    There is some honeysuckle growing down the road from me that has been there for at least 25 years.
    I'm wondering what type it might be and if it would be ok to transplant some. I stopped and looked at it today and the deer are really browsing it hard.
    I geuss i'm thinking that it is native and would be ok to put some on my place but i sure dont know anything about the stuff.
     
  2. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD New Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Is it a vine?

    I'd be real cautious about transplanting some. I'd guess it to be Japanese Honeysuckle. Yep deer browse it, but I wouldn't plant it my my place. Probably not native. Again, I'm just guessing though.
     

  3. Ozarks-Bowhunter

    Ozarks-Bowhunter Active Member

    Jan 28, 2006
    Southern Missouri
    Ya it's a vine type. I dont know why i couldn't remember that it was probably Japanese Honeysuckle. I'm having the state forester out so i suppose i could run it by him and see what he has to say. It has been in this one spot for as long as i can remember and hasn't spread too much it appears. I havn't seen it anywhere else close to us at all.
     
  4. pinwheel

    pinwheel Jenny's Lackey

    Jun 17, 2006
    middle of nowhere
    I'd sure want to identify it as native before I transplanted it into my place. Getting invasives back under control after they've spread can me a nightmare.
     
  5. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    Could it be Yellowhoneysuckle?? That is a native vine..if it is japanese, I would kill it now. Here is a pic of the native yellowhoneysuckle I put on my farm.

    [file]86971[/file]
     
  6. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    Here are some pics of the Japanese Honeysuckle. The leaves are not as rounded as on the native one. If it is the native one you have, I would like some seeds. :D


    [file]86973[/file]


    [file]86974[/file]
     
  7. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    Also the Japanese Honeysuckle has a black berry that is 6 mm in diamater. The native Yellow Honeysuckle has red berries,
     
  8. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    i was going to ask the difference. i guess i've got native. sure are pretty when the berries are on them. the birds have been hitting them hard. i guess it's time to keep an eye out for the black berried ones. :cheers:
     
  9. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD New Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    I've never seen the native honeysuckle. I'm not really sure how common it is.

    Or maybe I just stink at ID'ing it. :whiteflag:
     
  10. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    [rquote=1528379&tid=106528&author=HabitatMD]I've never seen the native honeysuckle. I'm not really sure how common it is.

    Or maybe I just stink at ID'ing it. :whiteflag:[/rquote]

    i'll see if i can get a picture and see if you guys can id it.
     
  11. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    I would make sure it is a native, I belive the native is pretty slow growing, or at least it was for me. Here is some info on the native one. I believe that there are some other honeysuckles that have red berries so be careful...bush honeysuckle for sure does.

    "Native Yellow Honeysuckle, is a desirable landscape vine native to the US and should not be confused with the invasive alien Japanese Honeysuckle. Native Yellow Honeysuckle vines are very showy with unusual foliage, bright yellow flowers that turn reddish as they age, and attractive clusters of red fruits in the Fall. This plant grows up to 10-20' feet tall with opposite, sessile, ovate leaves. Shiny clusters of bright orange red fruit in the fall give an additional reason to grow native Yellow Honeysuckle.

    Lonicera flava is easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Yellow Honeysuckle is best planted near a structure upon which to grow and some help in twining up that structure, or it may simply become shrubby or trail along the ground. yellow Honeysuckle flower best in full sun. This vine is NOT INVASIVE and should not be confused with the weedy Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica).

    Lonicera flava or yellow honeysuckle is a deciduous, woody, twining vine which typically grows 10-20'. It is a native vine which occurs in rocky soils in woods, slopes, bluffs, ledges and stream margins from Kansas Eastward. Elliptic green leaves (to 3.5" long) are grayish green below and are paired along the stems, with the uppermost leaves on each stem joined at the bases (perfoliate). Two-lipped, tubular, mildly-fragrant, orange-yellow flowers (to 1.25" long) appear in whorls at the stem ends in mid-spring. Flowers give way to round, fleshy, orange to red berries (1/4" diameter) which appear in late summer. Berries are not edible, but birds love them. Hummingbirds and butterflies are attracted to the flowers.

    The species is found only in the central to southeastern United States (historically in 12 states) and nowhere else in the world. It propagates primarily by seeds, but its stems are capable of rooting and new plants are easily established.

    Native Yellow Honeysuckle does not have any serious insect or disease problems.

    Lonicera flava Yellow Honeysuckle is a good choice for a trellis, arbor or fence and a good vine for a native plant garden or bird garden. Yellow Honeysuckle can be grown along the ground as a ground cover in wild or naturalized areas.

    This delightfully unusual flowers of wild Lonicera flava, Native Yellow Honeysuckle bloom in April, May, June, and July in moist shade along rocky slopes in woods, in ravines, and along bluffs. Family: Caprifoliaceae."
     
  12. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    Here is a close up of the flowers on the native.


    [file]86975[/file]


    [file]86977[/file]
     
  13. OutbackBio

    OutbackBio New Member

    When it comes to honeysuckle, I would suggest not transplanting. There is a native vining honeysuckle in MO but most of the honeysuckle I have seen in my landowner visits is non-native and tends to take over a timber in no time. The two most common are Japanese Honeysuckle (vining) and Shrub or Bush Honeysuckle (grows in clumps like a shrub). Both will have white flowers but the Bush Honeysuckle does produce numerous red berries and the Japanese produces dark berries. If you would like control reccomendations for Invasive Species, contact your local Private Land Conservationist for more information.
     
  14. citybowhunter

    citybowhunter Senior Member

    Feb 13, 2009
    Independence Mo.
    looks like i've got bush honeysuckle then. thanks for the info.
     
  15. Ozarks-Bowhunter

    Ozarks-Bowhunter Active Member

    Jan 28, 2006
    Southern Missouri
    Here's a pic of what I've got growing near me. I didn't see any berries, but I wasn't looking for them.

    [file]87008[/file]
     
  16. HabitatMD

    HabitatMD New Member

    Jan 4, 2007
    St. Louis, Mo
    Looks like Japanese to me. Be alot safer to grow a winter wheat or winter rye plot rather than transplant it. Some folks love it for deer browse, I just think there are much better alternatives than introducing it to a place that doesn't have it. That's my 2 cents.
     
  17. letemgrow

    letemgrow Active Member

    That looks like Japanese to me too...I say kill as many of them as you can find. :cheers:
     
  18. OutbackBio

    OutbackBio New Member

    Ozarks-bowhunter, is it growing on a vine or does it look like a shrub? Most of Northern MO does not see much of the Native Honeysuckle. My advice, like others on this topic is kill it and plant something else that is not going to take over your entire property in 10 years. If you can, get ahold of your local Private Lands Conservationist to come out and ID it in the field for you. This is much easier for us than looking at pictures and they could also give you other habitat reccomendations while on site. We are here to help you all get the most bang for your buck so to speak. Good luck and remember, most of MO is under private land ownership, we cannot make MO better without you!!!