Missouri Whitetails > Whitetail Hunting....... > Deer Management, Habitat & Conservation > apple trees?


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Old 01-16-2012, 09:25 PM   #1
chuck88
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Default apple trees?

ok I own 17 acres, but its ALL pasture. now across the road its pasture for about 250 yards before it hits any timber (national forest) and behind our house is our pasture, then 150 yards of neighbors pasture before it again hits national forest and is wooded. since buying this farm in 2008 I have seen 5 deer during daylight hours on our place, and just passing through in a hurry but when it snows I've seen where they cross the road going from the chunk of woods behind us, to the chunk in front of us.
anyway I was pondering fencing off a section and planting 1/2 dozen off the biggest apple tree's I could buy of different varietys so hopefully they get ripe at different times. I still know that hunting my land would still be pretty pointless as I know it would still be nighttime movement on my property. but I was thinking if I planted the tree's as close as I could to the back and only about 150 yards from the timber if it would be worth it, then I could hunt near the fence line on the national forest as it may be a staging area to wait for dark.
if my rambling makes sense and you have any idea's or think I'm wasting my time please tell me



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Old 01-16-2012, 09:54 PM   #2
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Sounds like a pretty good idea to me,anything to improve Your Land and draw the Deer in can't hurt.


The Dwarf Fruit Tree's are easier to keep up,prune and pick fruit/apples from and cost a little more,I think there's another tree that grows a little bit between the standard Fruit Tree's and then the regular size Fruit Tree's,make sure You protect them and wrap wire around them to keep the Deer from damaging them.As You mentioned different Varieties will keep You in apples for a long time if they rippen at different times....another tree to consider would be a Pear Tree,some Tree's need another to Pollenate while other cross-pollenate,You may have to check on the individual Tree Info to see what works well with each other?



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Old 01-16-2012, 09:57 PM   #3
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apple trees will take you about 10 yrs before you get any fruit unless you get some of the dwarf trees. What if you planted a a ton of hybrid poplars and made your place a nice little wood lot itself. You got any water sources close?

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Old 01-16-2012, 10:41 PM   #4
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well ultimatly the main reason I own the land is for livestock grazing. but there's been more than a few times I've debated selling off all the livestock and planting 12 acres in tree's and leaving 5 acres for a food plot. but I doubt that'll ever happen. I know I'm not a big time livestock producer and am more of a hobby farmer, but having the animals is something I enjoy and gives the kids a since of responsibilty as they own their own sheep also.
just trying to come up with a way to improve the hunting around my area.

how long does it take for dwarf tree's to produce fruit? maybe a few dwarfs to get started and have some full sizes planted also

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Old 01-16-2012, 10:41 PM   #5
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I would think a clover plot would be much more beneficial, cheaper and faster. Their still hard in my clover

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Old 01-16-2012, 11:40 PM   #6
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Sounds like a great place for some apple trees, pear trees (they are less work than apples), persimmons, clover plot and a winter rye plot.

For apple trees, I like Arkansas Black, Liberty, Yates and Hewes crabapples. They grow the best from the 50 varieties I have planted and drop later in the year.

Do you have clay soils? Soil type will be a determining factor on which rootstock to go with. I would go with a semi-dwarf or standard apple rootstock instead of a dwarf...the dwarf fruit faster, but also die much faster than semi or standard rootstock. I can give you a few online nurseries I have ordred from several times and they always send really good stock.

Reason why I would also include pears, they are much more disease resistant than apples and require less maintenance than apple trees. The 3 I listed above seem to do well and have not required any spraying thus far...at least on my place. Some of the others got what looks like fire blight and CAR (cedar apple rust). An apple tree can have 500 pound of fruit in one year, so 5-6 apples trees, 5-6 pear trees, 25 persimmons from MDC nursery, 1 acre of clover and 1 acre of cereal grains would take up minimal space and provide lasting results.

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Old 01-16-2012, 11:45 PM   #7
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If if the deer don't use them during daylight hours, you still can.

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Old 01-16-2012, 11:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
apple trees will take you about 10 yrs before you get any fruit unless you get some of the dwarf trees. What if you planted a a ton of hybrid poplars and made your place a nice little wood lot itself. You got any water sources close?


Some of my apple trees on MM111 had apples on year 5. Not many, but they should only get better from here on out and by year 10 they should really be bumping out the fruits.
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Old 01-17-2012, 03:42 AM   #9
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letemgrow, what are MM111 trees? We are considering planting a small (1-2 acre) apple/fruit orchard, but we are pretty clueless when it comes to fruit trees. Would like trees that would benefit wildlife and us.

Have looked at different hybrid varieties on Morse Nursery's website, but are pretty much undecided on what varieties would be best for us. Our farm is located in the Fort Leonard Wood area so our winters aren't quite as bad as everybody north of the river. Trees would be planted on well-drained soil.

Would we want to kill the sod of the entire orchard and plant a cool season or warm season grass?

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Old 01-17-2012, 01:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
letemgrow, what are MM111 trees? We are considering planting a small (1-2 acre) apple/fruit orchard, but we are pretty clueless when it comes to fruit trees. Would like trees that would benefit wildlife and us.

Have looked at different hybrid varieties on Morse Nursery's website, but are pretty much undecided on what varieties would be best for us. Our farm is located in the Fort Leonard Wood area so our winters aren't quite as bad as everybody north of the river. Trees would be planted on well-drained soil.

Would we want to kill the sod of the entire orchard and plant a cool season or warm season grass?



I would kill the sod for certain before planting them, apples trees also like lime unless you soils are close to neutral already. Tons of rodents all the way up to deer like the foliage/bark on a young apple tree so fence them off and use aluminum window screening around the bases to keep the rodents from girdling the bark.

That is the rootstock my trees are on, there are tons of different rootstock types and it depends on your soil which one would be best.

The MM111 is more for clay soils, B118 is for sandy loam (if I remember right) for instance.

I would order grafted trees so you know what you are going to get, Morse's are from seeds so you may get a great apple tree....or a dud.

My favorites are:

Century Farms
Cummins Nursery
Adams County

Never ordered from Stark Brothers, but I hear they are a good source and from MO. I would call the place you are going to order from, ask questions like drop times, disease resistance, rootstock that will be good for your soil and go from there.


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